Tag Archives: 9

Arch K. Fleming

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

pg. 735

Members of the House of Delegates.

FLEMING, ARCH K. (Republican.) Address:
Folsom, West Va. Delegate from Doddridge county.
Born at Center Point, in that county, May 31, 1892;
received his elementary education in the common schools
and afterwards took special courses at the State Normal
School, at Fairmont, and the West Virginia Business
College, at Salem; a teacher by profession; was chosen
to represent Doddridge county in the Legislature at the
November election, 1916, and in the sessions of 1917 served
on House standing committees on Prohibition and Tem-
perance, Education, Virginia Debt, Medicine and Sanita-
tion, Counties. Districts and Municipal Corporations.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

George William Parr

DODDRIDGE COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA – BIOS: PARR, George William
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Valerie & Tommy Crook
vfcrook@trellis.net
September 24, 1999
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The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 263
Doddridge County

GEORGE WILLIAM PARR, who began the practice of law
in West Union more than forty years ago, has served the
profession with all his abilities and character, has earned
those things that constitute success, and among other
honors was for some time judge of the circuit including
Doddridge County.

Judge Parr was born on a farm in Fayette County,
West Virginia, December 18, 1857; son of Wesley J. and
Elizabeth (McCue) Parr. His father was born February
6, 1824, in Vermont, son of Artemus and Chloe Farr.
Artemus Farr was born and reared on the south coast of
Wales, and on coming to America settled in Vermont.
He was accompanied by three brothers to this country.
Wesley J. Farr was thirteen years of age when his father
died in 1837, and he was soon bound out to a New York
man, but on account of cruel treatment ran away and
walked to New York City and from there traveled by
steamboat to Richmond, Virginia. In Virginia he sought
work, and was variously employed for several years and
in the meantime added to his education by private study.
He finally moved to what is now Pocahontas County, West
Virginia, and a few years later to Nicholas County, where
he met and married Elizabeth McCue. She was born in
Nicholas County, daughter of John and Malinda (Mc-
Clung) McCue, natives of Nicholas County, where they
spent their lives. After his marriage Wesley Farr re-
mained in Nicholas County farming until 1856, and then
established his home on another farm in Fayette County,
where he lived until his death, on May 29, 1900. His wife,
Elizabeth, died in 1866, the mother of five children, two of
whom died in infancy. The other three were: Chloe M.,
Mrs. Charles Judy, of Lansing, West Virginia; George
W.; and James C., of Fayetteville. For his second wife
Wesley Farr married Mary E. Legg, who was born and
reared in Fayette County, and is still living. She became
the mother of nine children, named Ellen, Leonard, Grant,
Rosa, Walter, Arthur, Susan, John and Lud.

Wesley Farr was a member of the Methodist Episcopal
Church, was a man of intellectual power and force of
character, and in spite of the fact that he was largely
self educated he was regarded as one of the best informed
men in his county. He held several positions of honor and
trust, being a member of the County Court and justice of
the peace. He was a strong Union man in the Civil war.
In politics he was a democrat up to the war, but ever
after was a republican.

Judge George W. Parr attended rural schools, and after
exhausting these advantages he became in turn a teacher
and taught for six terms. In the meantime he was study-
ing law, and in April, 1881, he wag admitted to the bar
and on the twenty-fifth of the same month he established
his office at West Union. During all the busy years of a
professional career he has looked after an extensive private
practice, has served as county prosecuting attorney, as
mayor of West Union, for eight years was a state senator,
and resigned that office to become judge of the Circuit
Court by appointment from Governor Atkinson to fill a
vacancy. He was on the bench for twenty months, and
then resumed private practice. Judge Farr has farm in-
terests and has prospered in his business affairs as well
as in his profession. He is a republican and a member of
the Methodist Church.

On April 15, 1886, Judge Farr married Miss Agnes V.
Stuart. Her father, Chapman J. Stuart, one of the able
lawyers and prominent citizens of West Virginia, was born
in Highland County, Virginia, January 8, 1820, and died
at West Union, April 20, 1888, a son of Edward and
Margaret A. Stuart, who removed to Harrison County,
West Virginia, in 1822. The first wife of Chapman 3.
Stuart was Elizabeth E. Little, a native of Bedford
County, Pennsylvania, who died in 1855. In 1858 he
married Mary A. Stuart, who was born in Bath County,
Virginia. Chapman J. Stuart served as county prosecutor
from 1852 to 1861. He was an opponent of secession, and
sat as a member of the First Wheeling Convention of
1861, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of
1862, and in 1863 was elected judge of the Circuit Court
and was on the bench for ten years, until 1873. His public
service to the state continued after leaving the bench, and
in 1874-75 and again in 1878-79 he represented Doddridge
County in the Legislature. During the Civil war he did
some valuable work as a lieutenant of the Fourteenth West
Virginia Infantry in recruiting Union soldiers, raising
Company A of that regiment. He was a democrat and a
member of the Methodist Church.

Judge and Mrs. Farr have two children: Mary and
Ruby T. Mary is the deceased wife of Ed. Maxwell, and
her only child, Mary Agnes, is now being reared in the
home of her grandparents, Judge and Mrs. Farr. Ruby is
the wife of Everet W. Maxwell.

Robert Bland

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

pg. 731

Members of the House of Delegates.

BLAND, ROBERT.- (Democrat.) Address: Logan,
West Va. Born on a farm in Doddridge county; received
his earlier education in public schools and later attended
West Virginia University; a practicing attorney, receiving
his legal training in the law school of the University; served
four years as Mayor of the city of Logan and eight years as
Assistant Prosecuting Attorney of Logan county; elected to
the House of Delegates in 1914; re-elected in 1916; assigned
to the following standing committees in 1917: Mines and
Mining (Chairman); Judiciary, Labor, Forfeited and Un-
appropriated Lands, Virginia Debt.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

Russell Wright

DODDRIDGE COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Tina Hursh
Frog158@juno.com
December 9, 1999
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The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume II
Pg. 70-71

Russell Wright is consistently to be designated as one of the vital
and representative young captains of industry residing in the City of
Parkersburg, and he is not only a man of marked progressiveness and energy in
connection with business enterprise of broad scope, but is also one of the
loyal and vigorous advocates of measures and undertakings tending to advance
the interests of his home city and native state. Mr. Wright is president of
the Wright & Loper Oil Company, and also of the Shawnee Oil & Gas Producing
Company, important corporations identified with the oil industry in West
Virginia fields.
Mr. Wright was born on the homestead farm of his parents in Doddridge
County, West Virginia, and the date of his nativity was August 5, 1878. He is
one of the four children of William L. and Ella (Allen) Wright, who still reside
in Doddridge County, where the father was born and reared and where the Wright
family made settlement in the pioneer days. Russell Wright gained his youthful
education in the public schools of his native county, and continued his
association with the work of the home farm until he was sixteen years old.
He then began working in the oil fields of Doddridge and Tyler counties, and as
he had the versatility that made his services of value in all manner of work
and positions he gained a wide and varied experience. Eventually he bagan to
assume a larger share of independent activities and in this way he both made and
lost money, according to the results attending his various exploitations. He
extended his experience by association with oil-production enterprises in the
fields of Oklahoma, Indiana and Illinois, but after an absence of two years
he returned to West Virginia, where his operations have since been largely
staged, though he has had and continues to have interests in connection with oil
production in Ohio. He has maintained his residence and business headquarters
at Parkersburg since 1912, and since 1913 his business operations have been
confined to the West Virginia and Ohio oil fields. He well merits the
expressive American title of hustler, and has made himself known as a vigorous
and progressive factor in the great oil industry. He is a valued and
influential member of the Parkersburg Chamber of Commerce, is affiliated with
the Parkersburg lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a
member of the Blennerhassett Club and is popular in both business and social
circles in his home city, where his name remains on the list of eligible
bachelors.

Wallace B. Gribble

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

pg. 725

GRIBBLE, WALLACE B. (Republican.) Address:
West Union, West Va. Was born at Oxford, Doddridge
county; educated in the common and high schools; is an
attorney by profession; took a special course in law at
West Virginia University; has served as Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court and also as Sheriff of Doddridge county; was
elected to the State Senate from the Twelfth District at the
November election, 1916; is a hold-over Senator; standing
committee assignments in the sessions of 1917: Immigra-
tion and Agriculture (Chairman); Finance, Counties and
Municipal Corporations, Penitentiary, Militia, Insurance,
Medicine and Sanitation, To Examine the Clerk’s Office.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook