Category Archives: Tyler

Adam Grow

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Chris & Kerry
cmac4330@chesapeake.net
December 10, 1999
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The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.
Chicago and New York, Volume II
pg.150 & 151

ADAM GROW, a member of the firm of Jackson & Grow, which conducts a well
equipped general machine shop in the City of Morgantown, Monongalia County, was
born at Grafton, Taylor County, West Virginia, October 17, 1887, a son of Lewton
W. and Anna C. (Davis) Grow, both like-wise natives of this state. Lewton W.
Grow was born in Taylor County in 1858, a son of Adam Grow, who was an old-time
plasterer and under whose direction the son, Lewton W., learned the same trade,
of which he continued a representative, as a contract plasterer, for many years
at Grafton, where he and his wife still maintain their home and where he is now
living virtually retired. Mrs. Grow was born in the year 1863. Both are active
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Adam Grow (II), the immediate subject of this review, acquired his early
education in the public schools of his native city, and there in 1902 he entered
upon an apprenticeship to the machinist’s trade. He became a skilled workman,
and continued to be employed in the railroad shops at Grafton until the time of
the strike of the workmen in the shops in 1909. In that year he removed to
Morgantown, where for the ensuing eight years he was employed as a machinist by
the Morgantown & Kingwood Railroad Company.

In 1917 Mr. Grow formed a partnership with Curtis G. Jackson, another skilled
machinist, and under the firm name of Jackson & Grow they opened a small machine
shop at Morgantown. Excellent service and fair and honorable business policies
caused the enterprise to expand from year to year, and the firm now owns the
large and modern brick machine shop building that is the stage of the
substantial and prosperous industry which they have built up, the establishment,
on the west side of the river, being the largest of the kind in Morgantown and
controlling a representative supporting patronage.

In 1911 Mr. Grow was raised to the degree of Master Mason in Morgantown Union
Lodge No. 4, Free and Accepted Masons, and in this lodge he has passed the
various official chairs, the final honor of being chosen master of the lodge
having come to him in December, 1920. He is affiliated also with Morgantown
Chapter No. 30, Royal Arch Masons; Morgatown Commandery No. 18, Knights
Templars; Morgantown Lodge of Perfection No. 6, Scottish Rite, and has received
the thirty-second degree of this latter rite in West Virginia Sovereign
Consistory No. 1, besides being a member of Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine
at Wheeling. He and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church,
South.

Mr. Grow chose as his wife Miss Lucy E. Frankhouser, who was born in the State
of Maryland and who is a daughter of Ammi and Ellen Frankhouser. Mr. and Mrs.
Grow have three children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here
recorded: Margaret Lucile, November 29, 1915; Adam III, November 29, 1917; and
Clyde, January 12, 1921.

Benjamin Rymer Twyman

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

750

TWYMAN, BENJAMIN RYMER. (Republican.)
Address: Cairo, West Va. Born in Tyler county March
15, 1860; educated in the public schools and the Fairmont
State Normal; was President of the Board of Education
of his home district and Postmaster at Cairo from 1901
until 1910; is at present engaged in farming and the
mercantile business, but is chiefly interested in scientific
farming; was elected to the Legislature from Ritchie
county in 1916; during the sessions of 1917 had the
following committee assignments: Counties, Districts
and Municipal Corporations, Insurance, Military Affairs.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

Hickman Francis Rodney

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

739

HICKMAN FRANCIS RODNEY. (Republican ) Ad-
dress: Middlebourne West Va. Representative from Ty-
ler county. Born at Middlebourne January 11 1870 and
received his education there in the public schools; now en-
gaged in the banking business; in past years served as
Deputy Clerk of the County Court and Deputy Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Tyler county; was connected with the
Bank of Middlebourne as Assistant Cashier and Cashier for
fourteen years; elected to the House of Delegates in 1916,
and in the sessions following served on the committees on
Prohibition and Temperance, Private Corporations and
Joint Stock Companies and Virginia Debt.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

Okey Johnson Hill

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Valerie & Tommy Crook
vfcrook@trellis.net
April 13, 2000
******************************************************************

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 404-405

OKEY JOHNSON HILL, now in his second term as Cir-
cuit Court clerk of Tyler County, is a man of versatile
gifts and attainments. He has taught school, has been a
successful lawyer and merchant, and is also a practical
farmer and stock raiser. In referring in this brief intro-
ductory way to his place in the affairs of Tyler County
it is appropriate to notice also that Mrs. Hill is deputy
Circuit Court clerk, a unique honor, since she is the only
woman in the state to fill such a position.

Okey Johnson Hill was born on McKim Creek in the Meade
District of Tyler County, June 27, 1872. His grandfather,
Thomas Hill, was a native of Pennsylvania, and as a
young man moved to Marion County, West Virginia, and
shortly after his marriage settled on McKim Creek, where
he spent the rest of his life as a farmer. He married
Miss Margaret Cooper, who also died at the old homestead
on McKim Creek. The farm they owned there was the
birthplace of Israel Nicholson Hill, who was born Novem-
ber 26, 1840, and in his mature years owned and farmed
the homestead and lived there all the days of his useful
and honorable life. He died December 1, 1916. He voted
as a republican and was always attentive to his duties as
a member of the United Brethren Church. During the
Civil war he served as a member of the Home Guards.
Israel N. Hill married Elizabeth McCullough, who was
born in Greene County, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1841,
and now at the age of four score is still living on the home
farm. She came when thirteen years of age with her
parents to Pleasants County, West Virginia. The children
born to her marriage were ten in number: George W., a
merchant and later a farmer, who died in Wood County,
West Virginia, September 29, 1910, aged forty-eight; Lan-
dora, living on her farm on Sancho Creek in Tyler County,
widow of Lloyd Davis; Horace Greeley, head carpenter in
a large furniture establishment at Detroit, Michigan; John
Taylor, a farmer three miles from Parkersburg in Wood
County; Okey Johnson; Ida Lorene, wife of Charles Shutt,
a farmer in Crawford County, Ohio; James Daniel, an
employe of the Hope Natural Gas Company at Clarksburg
in Harrison County; Oliver, an employe of the Oklahoma
Natural Gas Company, living at Warwick, that state; Miss
Ettie and Miss Florida, both on the home farm with their
mother.

Okey Johnson Hill stayed with the farm long enough
to learn its practical duties, and all his life has had more
or less active connection with agricultural matters. He
attended the rural schools, took normal training in Tyler
and Ritchie counties, and at the age of seventeen was ap-
pointed to his first responsibility as a teacher in the Brush
Run School of Meade District. He remained in Meade
District eight terms, and for one term taught in Center
District. In 1898 Mr. Hill became a merchant on McKim
Creek, and sold goods there until June, 1903. For nearly
two terms he had served as justice of the peace, and while
in that office he diligently studied law. Because of this
early preparation he was able to complete his law course
and graduate LL. B. from the West Virginia University
Law School in 1904, having entered the school September
22, 1903. Mr. Hill was admitted to the bar December 8,
1904, and for a year or so practiced in Middlebourne. In
1906 he moved to Friendly, Tyler County, and was a mer-
chant there six or seven years. On March 14, 1913, he
returned to Middlebourne to resume his law practice, but
in November of that year was by popular election called
to his present duties as Circuit Court clerk. He began his
first term of six years in January, 1915, and in November,
1920, was re-elected for a second six-year term. Besides
being clerk he is also commissioner in chancery of the
Tyler County Circuit Court.

Mr. Hill is a director of the Bank of Middlebourne and
secretary of the Tyler County Farm Bureau, his eligibility
to this office resting upon his ownership of 400 acres of
farming land in Tyler and Ritchie counties. He does gen-
eral farming and raises some blooded Polled Angus cattle.
Hia home is a modern residence in Middlebourne. Mr.
Hill is a republican, is a member of the Baptist Church,
and is now serving his fourth consecutive term as president
of the Tyler County Sunday School Association. He is a
trustee of his church. Fraternally he is affiliated with
Hebron Lodge No. 1ll, F. and A. M., in Pleasants County,
with Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., Mountain State
Commandery No. 14, K. T., and he and Mrs. Hill are
members of Friendly Chapter of the Eastern Star. He ia
a past grand of Friendly Lodge No. 350, Independent
Order of Odd Fellows, past chancellor of Middlebourne
Lodge No. 86, Knights of Pythias, and also belongs to the
Improved Order of Red Men, Junior Order United
Mechanics, Order of Owls, and is a member of the West
Virginia Bar Association. During the war he assumed a
personal share in the responsibilities for keeping Tyler
County well represented in all the war causes. He gave
much time to filling out questionnaires for recruits, and for
this work received an honorary discharge from the Govern-
ment, and also delivered a number of speeches in behalf
of Liberty Loans throughout the county.

On January 15, 1898, in Ritchie County, Mr. Hill mar-
ried Miss Zanie Alice Corbin, who was born at Highland
in that county, was reared there and acquired a common
school education. She is a member of the Baptist Church,
and in addition to looking after her home and children
is performing her duties as Deputy Circuit Court Clerk.

Her father, Joseph Corbin, was born near Highland in
Ritchie County, November 4, 1843, and was a leading
farmer in that section until he retired in 1914, while living
at Belmont in Pleasants County. He was a democrat, a
member of the Baptist Church and the Masonic fraternity.
Mr. Corbin married Julina Hogue, who wag born at Beech
Grove on Bond’s Creek in Ritchie County in 1845, and
died at her home near Highland in 1887. The children of
Mr. and Mrs. Corbin were: Olive, wife of William Boggess,
a farmer on Bond Creek; Alonzo Taylor, an oil contractor
at Muskogee, Oklahoma; Mrs. Hill; Floyd Haymond, fore-
man in the oil field of the Ranger District in Texas; Sarah
Rebecca, wife of Morris Morgan, an oil well contractor
of Muskogee, Oklahoma; Lillian, wife of Samuel Campbell,
a traveling salesman living at St. Mary’s in Pleasants
County; Howard, an oil well contractor at Muskogee.

Mr. and Mrs. Hill have an interesting family of six
children. The oldest, McKinley Tennyson, born February
18, 1899, is specializing in agriculture at West Virginia
University, and on September 18, 1918, was enrolled in
the Students Army Training Corps at Buckhannon, serving
until the armistice. He is a graduate of the Tyler County
High School at Middlebourne. The second son, Franklin
Herman, born March 26, 1901, is also a graduate of the
County High School, and is now specializing in mechanical
engineering at Virginia University. Edith Marion, born
February 18, 1903, is a graduate of the County High
School in the literary and normal courses, and is a teacher
in the Emerson School at Monongah in Marion County.
The three youngest children of Mr. and Mrs. Hill are
Zelma Rebecca, born September 18, 1904, in the sophomore
class of the County High School; Thelma, born September
8, 1911; and Ada Esther, born December 12, 1913.

Corley Raymond Ingram

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Valerie & Tommy Crook
vfcrook@earthlink.net
July 6, 2000
******************************************************************

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 453

CORLEY RAYMOND INGRAM while a young man for his
responsibilities as county superintendent of schools of
Tyler County, is exceptionally well qualified for leadership
in educational affairs. He is himself a man of thorough
education, high ideals, a splendid character, and has given
a most energetic administration of school matters and in
a way to set new standards of efficiency in the county.

Mr. Ingram was born at Alvy, Tyler County, May 3,
1896. His father, Jarrett Trainor Ingram, a son of Nathan
Ingram, was born in Tyler County in 1851, and has spent
all his life in the county. He now lives at Pursley. For
a number of years his interests were those of a farmer,
but he early became identified with the development of the
oil resources in the Sistersville field, has been a contractor,
and is still one of the heavy producers in that section. He
is a republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal
Church. Jarrett T. Ingram married Hannah Jane Mc-
Intyre, who was born at Alvy, Tyler County, in 1874. Her
father, James McIntyre, was also born at Alvy, in 1841,
has been a merchant and an extensive farmer, and still
owns the large farm on Pursley Creek where he resides.
He is a democrat in politics. James McIntyre married
Agnes Underwood, who was born in Tyler County in 1844.
They had a family of six children: Ikey M., connected
with the Goodrich Eubber Company at Akron, Ohio; Pearlie,
wife of Emanuel Elder, a farmer at Marysville, Ohio;
Laura, who died at the age of nineteen; Hannah Jane,
Mrs. Ingram; Anna, wife of David L. Core, a school teacher
at Pursley; and Benjamin Cleveland, an oil operator and
producer at Sistersville.

The children of Jarrett T. Ingram and wife were: Laura
Frances, wife of Louis Averele Gorrell, owner of a public
garage at Middlebourne; Miss Zelda May, at home; Corley
R.; Frederick Gay, a graduate of the County High School
and assisting his father in the oil business and on the
farm; Paul McClairn, who attended the County High School
two years and now works for his father; Norwood Trainor,
a student in the County High School; and Ruth Underwood,
attending the Middlebourne Grade School.

Corley Raymond Ingram first came in contact with the
rural schools of Tyler County as a pupil. For two years
he attended grade school at Sistersville, graduated in the
regular course and the teachers training course from the
Tyler County High School in 1917, and took two years of
training in the West Liberty State Normal School in Ohio
County. Mr. Ingram taught his first school at the age of
twenty years, looking after the rural school of Coal Valley.
In November, 1918, he was elected county superintendent,
and began his term of four years July 1, 1919. Under
his administrative supervision as county superintendent are
161 schools, with a corps of 161 teachers and a scholar-
ship enrollment of 4,500. Mr. Ingram is also president
of the Board of Directors of the Tyler County High School
and is a member of the State Educational Association and
the National Education Association. While in normal
school at West Liberty he was a member of the Webster
Literary Society and the Bryants Literary Society, and
also secretary of the Y. M. C. A. Poor eyesight caused
his rejection when he applied for service in the World war,
but he did all he could as a speaker and participant in
the various local drives. He is a republican, a member of
the Church of Christ, and is owner of an attractive resi-
dence in Middlebourne.

December 25, 1919, at Wheeling, Mr. Ingram married
Miss Ada Lallathin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Lalla-
thin, who live in Monroe County, Ohio, where her father
owns a large farm. Mr. and Mrs. Ingram have one daugh-
ter, Mary Katheryn, born July 15, 1921.

John D. Sweeney

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

748

SWEENEY, JOHN D. (Democrat.) Address: Wil-
liamstown, West Va. Born February 9, 1860, at Alma,
Tyler county; educated in the public schools and at the
West Virginia University, graduating in the class of 1885,
with degrees of B. S. and M. S.; eight years a member of
State Board of Examiners for teachers; assistant prin-
cipal and for six years principal of Concord State Normal;
state senator 1887-1891; engaged now in the oil business;
elected to the House from Wood county in 1916; com-
mittee assignments, 1917: Education (Chairman); Claims
and Grievances, Printing and Contingent Expenses,
Counties, Districts and Municipal Corporations.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

K. C. Moore

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA – BIOS: MOORE, K.C.
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Valerie & Tommy Crook
vfcrook@trellis.net
September 24, 1999
******************************************************************

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 272
Tyler County

K. C. MOORE started the practice of law in Tyler County
twenty years ago, and his sound abilities have brought him
a large practice and growing influence in the affairs of his
nativ.e county. He is a resident of Middlebourne, and is a
member of a family that for four or five generations has
been identified with West Virginia, chiefly as farmers, and
always as good substantial citizens of their respective
localities.

For several generations the Moores lived in Monongalia
County, where the family was established by the pioneer,
Alonzo Moore, who came from Maryland and was a farmer.
Alonzo was the great-great-grandfather of the Middle-
bourne attorney. His son, Phillip Moore, was also a native
of Maryland, but spent his active life as a farmer in
Monongalia County. The grandfather was William Moore,
who was born in Monongalia County in 1807, was reared
and married there, became a farmer, and in 1840 moved
his family to Tyier County. He became the pioneer fruit
grower of this county, and his orchards of cherries, apples,
peaches and plums were developed to commercial propor-
tions and did much to stimulate fruit growing in the county.
William Moore died at Joseph’s Mills in Tyier County in
1884. He was a whig and later a democrat in politics. His
first wife, grandmother of the Middlebourne lawyer, was
Rebecca Sine, a native of Monongalia County, who died at
Joseph’s Mills. By this marriage six sons and two daugh-
ters grew to mature years, all now deceased. By the second
marriage of William Moore there were nine children. The
third wife was Mrs. Ann (Johnson) Ellinger.

William Nelson Moore, a son of William and Rebecca
(Sine) Moore, was born in Monongalia County August 1,
1829, and was between ten and eleven years of age when
the family moved to Monongalia County and settled at
Joseph’s Mills. In that community he lived out his life
and was a highly successful farmer. In younger years he
filled the office of justice of the peace and was also a mem-
ber of the County Court. In polities he was a stanch
republican. He died at Joseph’s Mills December 6, 1919.
William N. Moore married Lucinda Sweeney, who was born
in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in 1832 and died at
Joseph’s Mills in September, 1907. She was the mother
of six children: Virginia, who died at the age of fifty-
nine at Shiloh in Tyier County, where her husband, Dr.
David C. Smith, is a well known physician; Sarah, a resident
of Pennsboro, West Virginia, widow of A. Nicholas For-
dyce, who was a school teacher and later a farmer; Mar-
garet A., living at the old homestead at Joseph’s Mills;
Mary E., who died aged fifty-six at Wilbur in Tyier
County, wife of J. Wesley Stewart, now a retired farmer
at Akron, Ohio; Charles, who owns and operates the old
homestead farm; and K. C. Moore, who is the youngest.

Mr. Moore, who was born October 16, 1874, grew up
on the old homestead, had the advantages of the rural
schools, spent one year in the West Liberty Normal School,
and graduated Bachelor of Pedagogy in 1896 from West
Virginia Wesleyan College at Buckhannon. He spent two
years in West Virginia University Law School and in 1900
was admitted to the bar and began practice at Sisters-
ville. A year later he moved to Middlebourne, where for
twenty years he has been busily engaged in handling a civil
and criminal practice, and since 1912 has been a member
of the firm, Underwood & Moore, one of the best known
law firms of Tyler County. Mr. Moore was prosecuting
attorney of Tyler County from 1908 to 1912. He has been
active in the republican party, has been a delegate to
state, congressional and judicial conventions, and in recent
years has seldom missed attending conventions for the
nomination of judicial and congressional candidates. He is
a member of the State Bar Association.

During the war Mr. Moore gave precedence to ench
work as he could perform for the Government, including the
filling out of questionnaires for recruited men in the
county and as a Four Minute Speaker in behalf of the
Liberty Loan, Bed Cross and other drives.

At Alma, West Virginia, in 1906, he married Miss Edna
E. Conaway, daughter of Dr. Eli B. and Mary Elizabeth
(Smith) Conaway. Her mother still lives at Alma, where
her father was a greatly loved country physician, prac-
ticing medicine forty-seven years. Mrs. Moore finished her
education in West Virginia Wesleyan College at Buckhan-
non. She has two children, Richard Conaway born Sep-
tember 9, 1907, and Mary Virginia, born August 13, 1909.

Madison Stathers

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Chris & Kerry
cmac4330@chesapeake.net
December 10, 1999
******************************************************************

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.
Chicago and New York, Volume II
pg.150

MADISON STATHERS, Ph. D., head of the department of Romance Languages of West
Virginia University, is a native West Virginian, and his pronounced inclination
for linguistic studies early lead him to an intense devotion to the language and
literature of modern Europe, and for over a decade he has been head of the
department, including instruction in the French and Spanish tongues at West
Virginia University.

Doctor Stathers was born near Alma, Tyler County, West Virginia, August 29,
1877, son of George B. and Sophia (Furbee) Stathers. His grandfather, George
Stathers, was born at Hull, England, June 8, 1817, and was a boy when he
accompanied his parents, John and Mrs. (Jennings) Stathers, to America, the
family settling at Centerville, Washington County, Pennsylvania, along the old
National Pike. George Stathers grew up there, and after his marriage located at
Scenery Hill in Washington County, where his wife, Mary Hill, was born.
Subsequently they removed to Tyler County, West Virginia, where George Stathers
died in 1895. George B. Stathers was born at Scenery Hill, Pennsylvania, May 16,
1846, and four years later accompanied his father and uncle to Alma, Tyler
County, West Virgina, where for many years he engaged in the mercantile and
lumber business and where he died December 7, 1916. He was a successful
businessman and also had a spiritual relationship with the Methodist Church
and its Sunday school, with the Masonic Order and frequently was a candidate for
important local offices. He was a democrat in politics. George B. Stathers
married Sophia Furbee, who was born at Alma, West Virginia, April 24, 1845, and
who is still living at the old home there. Her parents were Bowers and Nancy
(Bond) Furbee, the former a native of Delaware and the latter of Baltimore. The
Furbees are a very old American family, having been transplanted from England
during the seventeenth century. Caleb Furbee, great-grandfather of Doctor
Stathers, was a captain in the Revolutionary forces from Delaware. Late in life
he with his son, Bowers, and other children moved to what is now West Virginia
and settled near Rivesville in Monongalia County. George B.. Stathers and wife
had six children: Miss Mary Emma, at home; Madison; a son that died in infancy;
Roy and Ray, twins, the former dying in infancy, while the latter lives at the
old homestead at Alma; and George Lawrence, who died in infancy.

Madison Stathers was educated in the public schools of Tyler County, attended
West Virginia Wesleyan College at Buckhannon from 1896 to 1899, and took his A.
B. degree from West Virginia University in 1901. After a brief period of
employment in the general offices of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Pittsburgh he
returned to West Virginia Wesleyan College as a teacher in the year 1902-03. He
then went abroad for advanced studies leading to the Doctor’s degree, and in
1905 received the Ph. D. degree from the University of Grenoble, France. His
Doctor’s thesis was Chateaubriand et l’Amerique, published in book form by
Allier Freres at Grenoble. During the summer of 1905 Doctor Stathers continued
his studies in Spain, and for the school year 1905-06-was an instructor in West
Virginia Wesleyan College. In the fall of 1906 he joined the faculty of West
Virginia University as instructor in Romance Languages, was assistant professor
from 1907 to 1910, and since 1910 has been professor and head of the department.

His linguistic accomplishments include a fluent command of English, French,
Spanish and some German and Italian, and he also has a reading knowledge of the
Latin and Portugese. He is author of two school and college text books, “Lope de
Vega, La Moza de Cantaro” published by Henry Holt & Company, and an edition of
“Erckmann-Chatrian, Historie d’un conscri de 1813” published by Ginn & Company
of Boston in 1921.

Doctor Stathers was abroad on leave of absence from his duties at West Virginia
University studying in Spain and France during 1910 and again in 1921. He is a
life member of the Modern Languages Association of America, a life member of the
American Association of Teachers of Spanish, a member of the American
Association of University Professors, is a Phi Beta Kappa and a member of the
college fraternity Phi Kappa Psi; was a member for a time (Socio transeunte) of
the Ateneo of Madrid, Spain; a member of the West Virginia University Faculty
Club, and an honorary member of the English and French clubs of West Virginia
University. He has been a member of the advisory Board American Field Service
Fellowships for French University since 1920.

August 6, 1907, Doctor Stathers married Nellie M. Dauphinee at Colchester,
Connecticut. They have one son, George Dauphinee Stathers, born September 6,
1911. Doctor and Mrs. Stathers are members of the First Presbyterian Church at
Morgantown. Mrs. Stathers was born at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada, daughter
of J. Newton and Bessie (Begg) Dauphinee, natives of Nova Scotia, her father of
French and her mother of Scotch ancestry. Her parents now live at Colchester,
Connecticut. Mrs. Stathers was educated in Lunenburg Academy, in the Classical
High School of Providence, Rhode Island, and graduated A. B. from Brown
University of Providence in 1902.

Robert Livingstone Gregory

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature,
Officers of the State Governement and judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals,
West Virigina, 1917

Source:
West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official Register, 1917,
Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk of the Senate,
The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West Va.
pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

pg. 725

GREGORY, ROBERT LIVINGSTONE. (Republican.)
Address: Parkersburg, West Va. Born in Henry county,
Virginia, February 26, 1874, the son of a North Carolina
soldier of the Union; reared on a farm; educated at Ox-
ford, North Carolina, and the University of Virginia,
studying law at the latter institution; located subsequently
in Tyler county, this State; city attorney of Sistersville
four years; member of the House of Delegates in 1903-4;
elected to the Senate from the Third District in 1914;
committee assignments in 1917: Judiciary (Chairman);
Privileges and Elections, Roads and Navigation, Banks and
Corporations, Immigration and Agriculture, Medicine and
Sanitation, Labor, Public Library and the Virginia Debt.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

David E. Thoenen

TYLER COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA
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Submitted to the West Virginia Biographies Project by:
Valerie & Tommy Crook
vfcrook@earthlink.net
July 4, 2000
******************************************************************

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 418-419
Tyler

DAVID E. THOENEN. While its history as a village runs
back into pioneer times, Sistersville came into prominence
as a commercial center following the opening of the oil
field in that district about thirty years ago. The oil boom
was at its height when David E. Thoenen added his pres-
ence to this community. He has been prominently inter-
ested in oil operations in this and other fields, but for
twenty years has given chiefly of his time and effort to
banking.

Mr. Thoenen was born at Hannibal, Ohio, August 2,
1870. He is of Swiss ancestry, and the record of the
Thoenens in that little republic runs back, according to a
family Bible, printed in 1727 and in the possession of a
relative, to the year 1599. The great-grandfather of David
Thoenen was a Swiss physician, Jacob Thoenen, by name,
who served as a surgeon in the Swiss army, and was one
of the contingents gathered together in the great army of
Napoleon I. He participated in the ill-fated Russian cam-
paign, and while on the retreat from Moscow he lost his
life. The grandfather of David E. Thoenen was David
Thoenen, who was born in Switzerland in 1799, and mar-
ried in that country Mary Boren, who was born in 1805.
They came to the United States in 1828, settling at Hanni-
bal, Ohio, where David was a shoemaker and farmer. He
died at Hannibal in 1887 and his wife in 1894.

John F. Thoenen, father of the Sisterville banker, spent
all his life at Hannibal, where he was born in 1835 and
died in 1916. He owned and operated a large farm there,
and was a citizen of most substantial character, implicitly
trusted in business and civic affairs. For thirty-three years
he was treasurer of the German Farmers Mutual Fire In-
surance Company, held a number of local political offices
and was a leader in the democratic party. He was a vet-
eran Union soldier, serving four years in the Twenty-
fifth Ohio Infantry. He was a sergeant, and all through
the war he kept a diary of his experiences, a book now
carefully preserved by his son David E. Among the more
important battles in which he was engaged were those of
McDowell, second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Antietam,
Gettysburg and Winchester. He was a member of the Ger-
man Evangelical Church. John F. Thoenen married Cath-
erine Luikart, who was born in Wuertemberg, Germany,
in 1841, and the following year was brought by her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Luikart, to America. Jacob
Luikart was born in 1804, and on coming to the United
States in 1842 settled on a farm near Hannibal, Ohio,
where he died in 1874. Catherine Thoenen spent all her
life from infancy at Hannibal, where she died in 1918.
She was the mother of five children: Adaline, wife of
Julius Fraley, a farmer at Hannibal; David E.; Anna,
who died at Columbus, Ohio, aged thirty-seven, where her
husband, Henry Isaly, is a merchant; Rosa, at Hannibal,
widow of A. H. Walter, a school teacher; and Ida, wife of
Robert Yausey, a merchant at Akron, Ohio.

David E. Thoenen spent his early life at Hannibal, at-
tended the public schools there, and then taught rural
schools. He completed his education in Delaware, Ohio,
in 1894, and in 1895 removed to Sistersville. Here for
three years he had charge of a lumber yard, and then be-
came personally interested in the oil field and is still an
active oil operator, under the firm name of Tuel &
Thoenen.

Mr. Thoenen in 1902 helped organize the People’s Na-
tional Bank of Sistersville, which was opened for business
in January, 1903, and in which Mr. Thoenen has been a
director from the beginning. In 1909 he was made assist-
ant cashier and later promoted to cashier, and is now the
acting head of the institution. Mr. Thoenen served as
mayor of Sistersville one term. He is a democrat, is
junior warden of the Episcopal Church and is a past master
of Phoenix Lodge No. 73, A. F. and A. M., a past high
priest of Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., past com-
mander of Mountain State Commandery No. 14, K. T., a
thirty-second degree Mason and a member of West Virginia
Consistory No. 1 at Wheeling, and is a past potentate of
Nemesis Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Parkersburg. He
belongs to the Kiwanis Club and Country Club at Sisters-
ville.

In 1901, at Sistersville, Mr. Thoenen married Miss Mar-
guerite Russell, daughter of Joshua and Sarah (Sweeney)
Russell, now deceased. It should be recalled when speak-
ing of her father, Joshua Russell, that it was on his farm
that Polecat No. 1 oil well was drilled in 1890, that being
the opener of the Sistersville oil field. Mr. Russell besides
farming owned and operated a lumber and planing mill at
Sistersville. Mr. and Mrs. Thoenen have three children:
Earl Russell, born June 22, 1902, now a student in Swarth-
more College in Pennsylvania; Grace Virginia, born April
7, 1904, attending Martha Washington Seminary in Wash-
ington, D. C., and Eugene David, born March 23, 1910.