Category Archives: Raleigh

Ralph Stewart


RALPH  STEWART

By Nyla CREED DePauk

Captain Ralph Stewart was born ca 1752 on Cowpasture in  Augusta
County
, Virginia
He died
18 Nov 1835
in
Logan County, Virginia.  
He was married first to Mary Elliott ca 1768 in
Augusta
County
, Virginia
Mary seems to have died in
Kentucky
ca 1787.  Their children:

– 1   John Stewart was 
born
ca 1769.

– 2   Absolum Stewart was born ca 1770. 
He died ca 1829 in 
Lawrence County, Kentucky
He was married first to Susannah Smith, born ca 1777 in
Rockingham
County
, Virginia

Their  marriage was
30 Jul 1793 in Montgomery
County
, Virginia

Susannah died prior to 1798 in Montgomery County, Virginia.   
Absolum’s second wife was Tabitha Clay.  They were married on
26 May 1798 in Montgomery
County
, Virginia
.

-3   Ralph Stewart, Jr., was born ca
1772.  He married Elizabeth Elliot.

-4   Mary Ann “Annie” Stewart,  born ca 1773, married first Peter Phinny.  Her
second husband was William Walker.  They were married 
on
15 Nov 1791
in
Montgomery County, Virginia.

-5   James Stewart, born 1774, died 1835. 
He married Nancy Ann Burgess  on 7 Jun 1798
Montgomery County, Virginia

-6   Richard Stewart was born ca 1775.

-7   Elizabeth Stewart was born ca 1778. 
She married Lewis Phinny.

Capt Ralph Stewart married second Mary “Polly”
Clay who was born ca in  Bedford County,
Virginia.  They were married on
25 Jun 1788 in Montgomery
County
, Virginia

Mary died 25 Apr 1851 in Wyoming County,
West Virginia.  Mary was the daughter of
Mitchell Clay, Sr., and Phoebe Belcher Clay.
   Children of
Ralph and Mary:

-1  Phoebe Stewart was born
ca 1789 – 1791.  She was married to Samuel Morgan on 
3
Jun 1806
in Tazewell County,
Virginia
.

-2   Catherine “Katie” Stewart, born
15 Jun 1790 in  Giles County, Virginia, 
died on 26 May 1888 in Wyoming County,
West
Virginia
.   She married William Cook
who was born  in Jun 1784 in
Shenandoah
County
, Virginia
,
or in 
Montgomery County, Virginia
Their marriage date was 
16 Aug 1806
in 
Giles County, Virginia
Catherine died in Aug 1853 in Wyoming County,
West Virginia.  William’s parents were 
John
(Cooke) Cook and Nellie Gooodall Pemberton.  Catherine’s
second marriage was on
28 May
1861
to Reverend Layne (Lain) Shannon.

-3   Mitchell Stewart was born ca 1791. 
He died ca 1880-1883,  probably in
Lawrence
County
, Kentucky

Mitchell was married to
Frances
______  ca 1816.

-4   Rebecca “Becky” Stewart was  born ca 1793.  She died after 1850, probably in  Lawrence
County
, Kentucky

Rebecca married Isaac Chapman who was born ca 1790 and died
ca 1840, probably in Lawrence County,
Kentucky.  
Their marriage date was
15 Aug
1811
in Giles County,
Virginia
.  His parents
were George Chapman  and  Patience Clay
Chapman.

-5   Robert Stewart, was born ca 1795 – 1798,
and died after 1881.    His first wife was Mary Clay, believed
to be the daughter of David Clay.   Robert was married second to
______ Ball  ca 1850.  Her father was  James Ball.

-6   Sarah “Sallie” Stewart, born ca
1797 in
Montgomery
County,
Virginia,
died ca 1821.  She and Henry John Clay who was born ca 1781 in
Mercer
County
or Bedford
County
, Virginia

were the parents of  one child.   Henry died 12 Jan 1866 in Wyoming County,
West Virginia.  His parents were Mitchell Clay, Sr., and
Phoebe Belcher Clay.  Sarah was married on 12 Nov 1815 in Giles County,
Virginia, to Daniel H. Gunnoe who was born ca 1789 in Giles County, Virginia,
and died after the 1860 census.    His parents were John Gano
and Mary Stites Gano.

To view marriage bond.

To
view permission from Ralph Stewart
.

To view affidavit by Mitchel and
Henry Clay
.

-7   William R Stewart, was born 24 Mar 1800 in Virginia
He died 
6 Feb 1883
William married first  Susanna Selvage, a
daughter of James Selvage.  His second wife was Eleanor “Ellen”
Canterbury,
born
16 Apr 1808,
died
28 Nov 1895
They were married ca 1824 in
Giles County,
Virginia
.  Her parents
were Samuel Canterbury and  Jane Dick Canterbury.

-8   Margaret “Peggy”
Stewart was born ca  1803
Giles
County
, Virginia

She married Francis Hendrix who was born ca  1802
in
Virginia
Their marriage date was 
29 Mar 1820
in
Giles County, Virginia
His parents were Daniel Hendrix and Ann Keatley Hendrix.

                           
To view marriage bond.

-9  Amy Stewart
was born ca 1805.  She married Reverend John Quincy
Canterbury
who was born ca 1800.  Their marriage date was 
21 Jun 1820
in
Giles County, Virginia
John was the son of Samuel Canterbury  and Jane
Dick Canterbury.

-10   Henry C Stewart, born ca 1806,
married June Taylor ca  1835.

-11  Charles
Stewart,
8 May 1808,
died 
9 Feb 1898
Charles married Nancy Cook who was born 
20 Jun 1807
and died
16 May 1877.  
His parents were John “Old Jack” Cook, Jr., and 
Jennie
Albert Cook.

-12   George Pearis (Pemberton?)
(Peter?) Stewart born ca  Jun 1810 in Logan
County,  Virginia, died
11
Oct 1864
.   George married Margaret Cook who was
born ca  1812.  They were married 
3 Jan 1832 in  Giles
County
, Virginia
.  
Her parents were  John “Old Jack” Cook,
Jr., and Jennie Albert Cook.

-13   Ora (Aura Belle) Stewart, born
ca  Jan 1812, died ca 1893-1894 at Bee Branch,
Raleigh
County
, West Virginia
.  
She married Charles Lewis Clay, born ca 1801 – 1804 in
Montgomery
County
, Virginia

They were married ca Aug 1828-1830 in
Logan
County
or Fayette
County
, Virginia

Charles probably died in
Raleigh County,
West Virginia
.  
His parents were Mitchell Clay, Jr., and  Judith
“Juda” Clay.

       
        Obituary
of Rebecca Jane Clay Cantley (Ora and Charles’s daughter)
 

Ralph Stewart was allowed a Revolutionary War
pension based on his application, which was executed
10 Jan 1834.  At that time, he was
a resident of
Logan County, Virginia
Ralph died on
18 Nov 1835
His widow, Mary Clay Stewart was allowed a pension on her application, which
was executed on
17 Dec 1846
A that time, she was 74 years of age and living in
Logan
County
, Virginia
.

Some documents and articles relating to Ralph
Stewart follow.  All transcripts are by Rita O’Brien.

Affidavit by Edward Burgess
        Image    
Transcript

Affidavit by Patience Clay Chapman
        Image    
Transcript

Deposition of Mitchell Clay
       Image      
Transcript

Letter Concerning
Ralph Stewart and John Cook

Marriage Bond and Related Information for Ralph
Stewart and Mary Clay

        Image     
Transcript

Newspaper
Article Entitled “Ralph Stewart – Second Man to Follow Cooks

Partial
Transcript of Interrogatories from a Deposition Taken of Captain Ralph Stewart


Contained in His Pension Records from
National Archives in Washington, D.C.

Statement of Rev. Richard Brook, Francis
Hendrex, and Charles L. Clay

        Image        
Transcript

Pictures of
Ralph Stewart’s and Mary Clay Stewart’s Tombstones

Please let me know if
you can correct any of the above information.  I do not recall who sent me
the pictures of the tombstones.  If you are the person, please let me know
so I may give you credit for these wonderful pictures.  Thank
you.   My mail address is
ncreed1@aol.com.

                COPYRIGHT.

                2003

Robert Wriston MD







Wriston


 

The History of West Virginia, Old and New

Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,

Chicago and New York, Volume III,

pg. 355

ROBERT WRISTON, M. D. The career of Doctor Wriston as a physician and
surgeon began at Beckley in 1906. He is one of the very accomplished professional
men of Raleigh County, and has been very active in all that concerns his
profession and the general welfare and advancement of the community.

Doctor Wriston was born August 23, 1879, at Kincaid, in Fayette County,
West Virginia, son of  I. G. and Alice (Stanley) Wriston, natives
of this state. His grandfather, Caleb Wriston, served as a Confederate
soldier in the Civil war, and his maternal grandfather lost his life in
that struggle. The Wristons were of Scotch ancestry, and the family has
been in Virginia for a number of generations.  I. G. Wriston and wife
are now living retired at Nesco.  He has been a farmer and for two
terms held the office of justice of the peace. He is an active member of
the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Robert Wriston attended common schools in Raleigh County, his parents
moving here when he was a child.

Later he took the academic course in the Concord State Normal at Athens,
taught for five years, and then went

East and entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore,
where he graduated M. D. in 1905. For a year he was resident physician
in the City Hospital at Baltimore, and with that training he began his
work at Beckley. Doctor Wriston handles a general medical and surgical
practice, and every year or so he gets away from the routine of home duties
to come into contact with the leading men and schools of the country. He
took postgraduate work in the New York Polyclinic in 1908 and again in
1911, pursued special studies in Tulane University at New Orleans in 1917,
and in 1921 and 1922 pursued courses in the Augustana Hospital and under
Doctor Printy at Chicago.

In 1913 Doctor Wriston helped organize the Beckley Hospital, and he
owned a half interest in that institution

until January, 1922, and is still a member of the hospital staff. He
belongs to the County, State and Southern Medical Associations, is a republican,
is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and the Methodist Episcopal Church,
South.

In 1910, at Beckley, he married Miss Minnie Davis, daughter of John
P. and Mary (McGinnis) Davis. Her father’s career was distinguished by
its long and active connection with public service. He served as sheriff
two terms, as county clerk mid clerk of court, and he died while still
in public office. Doctor and Mrs. Wriston have four children, named Mary
Alice, June, Marjorie and Mattie.

Submitted by Valerie Crook

****************************************************************

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in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons. 
Persons or organizations desiring to use this material,

must obtain the written consent of the contributor, or the legal representative
of the submitter, and contact the listed USGenWeb archivist with proof
of this consent. Files may be printed or copied for personal use only.

****************************************************************

 

Stephen Adams




STEPHEN ADAMS

Biographical record of the class of 1850, Yale college

Yale University, Class of 1850, 1877,

Published by Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor,

Printer, New Haven, pages 6-7


Adams, Stephen (Albany, N.Y.), son of John L. Adams, was

born in Fulton, Schoharie Co., N.Y., Feb. 28 1829, and entered

the Class the second term Junior year from the Class of 1849,

having had been absent a year.

After graduation he was teaching in Amherst Co., Virginia,

till March, 1851, and the rest of the year was engineering for

James River and Kanawha Company. He spent several months,
till Sept. 1852, studying law in the office of R.J. Davis, Esq., of

Lynchburg, VA., when he again engaged in teaching, first as

Principal of the Elon Academy in Amherst for one year, and then

for two years in the family of Anthony Lawson, Esq., Logan Co.,

VA. In the fall of 1855 he was admitted to the bar in Lynchburg.

For several years he practiced law in Raleigh, Logan, and the

adjoining counties, in partnership with Hon. Evermont Ward.

The news that the convention of his State had passed the
ordinance of secession, which he had up to that time opposed
with all his might, both in private and on the hustings, found
him residing and practicing law at Raleigh C. H., (now) West
Virginia. He enlisted as a private in one of the first

volunteer regiments formed in that section for the Confederate
service. Upon the organization he was elected caption, and he
served in the field with the Army of Northern Virginia until
the battle of Winchester,Sept. 19 1864, when he was desperately
wounded while commanding the 30th Va. battalion, and was
taken prisoner. He was carried to the hospital at Frederick,
and when well enough to be exchanged he returned to Lynch-
burg. After the war, the laws of West Virginia then excluding
Confederate soldiers from its bar, Lynchburg, where he has
since been engaged in the pursuit of his profession. “With a
little cork skillfully inserted in my boot you would scarcely
1 observe in me any effect of the late little unpleasantness.
In conclusion, I will add that I am obeying the parting
injunction four beloved classmate, Sam Edwards in 1850:
`Steve, by all means, teach your boys to fiddle.'”

He was married April 26, 1854. to Miss Emma C. Saunders, of
Lynchburg, and has had six children: (1) John Lawson, born Oct.
13, 1855; (2) Stephen, born June 9, 1860, died March 22, 1862;
(3) William Saunders, born Dec. 9, 1861; (4) Peter O., born Sept.
21, 1866; (5) Benjamin Donald, born Sept. 19, 1870, died July
12, 1872; (6) Emma, born July 21, 1875.


Submitted by Valerie F. Crook

Email: vfcrook @trellis.net, 1999.





William H. Ruby







Ruby


 

The History of West Virginia, Old and New

Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,

Chicago and New York, Volume III,

pg. 549

Raleigh

WILLIAM H. RUBY, vice president and general manager of the Trace Fork
Coal Company, on the Virginian Railroad, one mile west of Mullens, general
manager of the Wilton Smokeless Coal Company, and president of the Spencer
Fork Coal Company on Piney branch of the same road, is one of the well
known figures in coal mining circles of Wyoming County. He has been identified
with one branch or another of this industry since boyhood, and his advancement
therein has been gained through sheer merit and not because of any fortuitous
chance or lucky circumstance.

Mr. Ruby was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, July 19, 1887, and is a son of
William Frederick and Minnie (Gilcher)

Ruby, natives of Germany. William Frederick Ruby was only twelve years
of age when he made the journey to

America alone to join four brothers and a sister, who had preceded
him to Cincinnati. For a period of thirty-six years he was identified with
the Fleischman Yeast Company, and during a large part of this time was
a foreman and one of the company’s most trusted employes. He retired two
years prior to his death, which occurred in 1921, at Cincinnati, when he
was sixty-three years of age. He was a faithful member of the Lutheran
Church, to which also belongs his wife, who was three years of age when
brought by her parents to the United States, and who is now a resident
of Cincinnati, aged sixty years. Mr. and Mrs. Ruby were the parents of
two sons: Walter W., sales manager for the Chesapeake & Virginian Coal
Company, at Lynchburg, Virginia; and William H.

William H. Ruby went to the public schools of Cincinnati and as a boy
displayed unusual industry and ambition. As soon as allowed he secured
employment, but after working at unskilled labor for several years came
to the conclusion that he should be better prepared for his struggle with
competition in the business world, and accordingly pursued a course in
general mechanics at the Ohio Mechanical Institute, which he finished at
the age of eighteen years. In 1907 he came to Prince, West Virginia, in
the capacity of rodman for the New River Collieries Company, and at the
end of two years had advanced to assistant in the engineering department.
He then became assistant engineer of the Gulf Smokeless Coal Company at
Tams, Raleigh County, a concern with which he remained for seven years,
at the end of which time he was superintendent of the Hotcoal Mine,

a Gulf Smokeless property. Subsequently for one and one-half years
Mr. Ruby was general superintendent of the Iroquois Coal Mining Company,
and in 1917, with others, purchased the Trace Fork Mine, of which he has
since been vice president and general manager.  During the five years
that he has been in charge there have been made numerous improvements,
including a new tipple, new houses, a new water system and steel mine cars.
Mr. Ruby’s official associates in this company are H. E. Tribou, president
of Tams; and R. F. Wildey, secretary- treasurer, of Tracoal. In April,
1920, Mr. Ruby became one of the organizers of the Wilton Smokeless Coal
Company, of which he is general manager, his associates being: J. B. Clifton,
of Beckley, president; C. H. Meador, Beckley, vice president; and H. R.
Tribou, Tams, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Ruby is a thoroughly

informed coal man, having worked his way up through the various branches
and learning the details of all during his upward climb. He has the full
confidence of his associates and the friendship and loyalty of his men.
He is a republican in his political affiliation, and his religious connection
is with the Lutheran Church, and as a fraternalist he belongs to the Blue
Lodge of Masonry at Tams, of which he is a past master, and the Mystic
Shrine at Charleston.

In June, 1913, Mr. Ruby married Miss Anna Mae Woldey, of Cincinnati,
Ohio, and to this union there have been born two children: William H.,
Jr., and Jack W.

 

Submitted by Valerie Crook

****************************************************************

USGENWEB NOTICE:  These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced
in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons. 
Persons or organizations desiring to use this material,

must obtain the written consent of the contributor, or the legal representative
of the submitter, and contact the listed USGenWeb archivist with proof
of this consent. Files may be printed or copied for personal use only.

****************************************************************

 

Herbert Jackson Stover

Herbert Jackson
Stover

 

It was my welcome mat on genealogy’s front porch–an E-mail received in
response to a query my wife had posted on the GenForum site.  She was inquiring about my Stover
connection.  The posting mentioned my
paternal grandmother Sadie Alice Stover and her brother Forest.

The response to the posting came at 2:33 AM EDT on 15 August 1999:
——————————————————————————

Hey, who is this??????????? You have to be one of my cousins!! 🙂

You didn’t sign your name. My Dad was Herbert Jackson Stover and Sadie was his
older half sister. Tom, my grandfather md Jenny Holstein, had Aunt Sadie and
Aunt Gladys and then after Jenny died, he md Gracie Nicholas…. Gracie was my
grandmother And yes, I know Uncle Forest… 🙂

Email me back at
ggracie@inetone.net

We are definitely related!!!!!!!!!

Gracie
——————————————————————————

That E-mail was my introduction to genealogy and more importantly to my cousin
Gracie, my closest online relative.  I
soon found that Gracie and I share more than just ancestry.  Our bond is that we are both children of
fathers who died in the prime of life. 
Since we were very young when it happened, we remember little, if
anything, about them.  What we do know
has been handed down to us by friends and family members.  Sure, oral legend paints with a biased
stroke, but we are hungry for any information. 
Genealogy, we’ve often said, feeds that need and allows us to learn more
about our fathers.  While it’s not as
satisfying as a son playing catch in the front yard or a daughter riding
“piggy back” through the house, it’s the best we’ve got.  Learning about the families of our fathers
is our solace and our therapy.

Before that monumental E-mail, I was unaware that my Grandmother even had a
brother named Herbert.  I only knew
about two of her siblings–Gladys and Forrest. 
I have learned a little more about Gracie’s father and my great uncle
since then.  With the assistance of oral
legend, genealogical records and a few souvenirs, I will attempt to tell the
story of Uncle Herbert.

Herbert Jackson Stover was born to the union of coal miner Linville Garrison
“Tom” Stover and Gracie P. Nicholas on 30 November 1925 in Marfork,
Raleigh County, WV.

It was “Tom” Stover’s second marriage. He had previously married
Virginia “Jenny” Holstein on 8 November 1902 in Boone County, WV.
“Tom” and “Jenny” had two daughters before
“Jenny’s” death on 26 March 1911 in McKendree, Fayette County,
WV.  Gladys Stover was born on 8
February 1906 in Kayford, Kanawha County, WV and Sadie Alice Stover, my
grandmother, was born on 29 April 1909 in Cabin Creek, Kanawha County, WV.

After “Jenny’s” death, “Tom” Stover married Gracie P.
Nicholas on 22 December 1915 in Raleigh County, WV.  They would have 11 children. Herbert Jackson Stover’s siblings
were:

Ralph Edward Stover born 20 October 1916
Mary Ella Stover born 3 January 1918 (stillborn)
Cebert Ray Stover born 22 December 1918
Virgil Clinton Stover born 19 January 1921
Horace “Forest” Stover born 8 September 1922
Lillie Thelma Stover born 14 December 1926
Stella Beatrice Stover born 27 October 1930
Inez Marie Stover born 24 April 1935
Sheba Jewell Stover born 14 February 1938 (stillborn)
Mabel Stover (no birth date known at present)

According to his daughter Gracie, Uncle Herbert “was not very well
educated, went to the 8th grade I believe. But his sister Stella, said he loved
to read and do crossword puzzles, so he was self-educated.”

Herbert, the youngest son of “Tom” Stover, fought in WW2, as did his
older brothers–Ralph, Virgil, Cebert & Forest.  According to his military records, Uncle Herbert was a 1st
Sgt./Master Sgt. in Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division
of the United States Army.  His service
in the Pacific garnered the following decorations, medals & citations:

American Theater Ribbon
Asiatic Pacific Theater Ribbon with 3 Bronze Stars
Philippine Liberation Ribbon with one Bronze Star
Good Conduct Medal
Victory Medal

According to Uncle Herbert’s discharge papers, he sent all of his money home to
his family, claiming his young sisters as dependents.  Cousin Gracie explained, “Tom Stover was really sick at the
time, too ill to work.  So dad helped
his family in that way.”

After World War 2, Herbert returned home and married Betty Jo Stilwell,
d/o  Shirley Stilwell and Octavia
Elizabeth Bowles, on 15 August 1946. 
Gracie explained her parents’ special relationship, “Mother told me
that they would both wake up at night and find they had been dreaming the same
thing at the same time…”

Herbert would soon become the father of two children, a boy and a girl.  Herbert Jackson Stover, Jr. was born 11
October 1947 in Marfork, Raleigh County, WV. 
Gracie Elizabeth Stover would follow on 8 August 1949 in Charleston,
Kanawha County, WV.

Herbert was a secretary for the local miners’ union and also sang tenor in a
local gospel group known as the Packsville Quartet.  Nyla Creed DePauk, a Raleigh County researcher, concluded,
“both of these tell me that he was a conscientious honest person with
respect from his peers. He obviously had musical talent if he sang with a
quartet.”

I learned a little more about Uncle Herbert when my mother gave me a letter
that my father had sent home from the Korean War zone.

It had been given to my mother by my grandmother Sadie Stover Peters, sister to
Herbert.  It was postmarked 23 March
1951 and was from PFC Shelby H. Peters, somewhere in Korea, to his mother, in
Williamsburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.  PFC Peters was a month past his 18th birthday. The letter is as
follows:
——————————————————————————

March 14, 1951
Somewhere in Korea

Dear Mom:

I will write a few lines to let you know I am alright.

I hope all of you are feeling good now. 
We had an orphan kid we had been keeping with the squad & when we
moved out the other morning, he fell off the truck & the trailer run over
him.  He died about 10 minutes later.

I was sorry to hear about Shirley Stilwell but I knew I would never see him
again.  Has Herbert gone back to work
yet?  Did you get Lloyd any shoes yet?  I will close for now. Answer soon.

Love to All
Shelby
——————————————————————————

Shirley Stilwell, Uncle Herbert’s father-in-law, had recently passed. Cousin
Gracie explained further, ” … my Grandfather Shirley Stilwell died and
Dad sang at the funeral, even though he was sick himself.  A Stilwell uncle remembers that he looked
ill.”

Herbert Jackson Stover died some four months after my father’s letter, on 30
July 1951, from complications associated with stomach ulcers.  His obit as it appeared in the August 2nd
edition of The Charleston Gazette is as follows:

“Stover, Herbert Jackson – 26, of Marfork died Tuesday in a Charleston
hospital.  Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Betty Jo Stilwell Stover; one son,
Herbert Jackson, Jr.; one daughter, Grace Elizabeth; mother, Mrs. Grace Stover
of Paxville; four brothers, Ralph and Virgil of Marfork, Cebert of Bloomingrose
and Forrest of Paxville; six sisters, Mrs. Gladys Jarrell and  Miss Inez Stover of Paxville, Mrs. Sadie
Peters of Williamsburg, Mrs. Lilly Anderson and Mrs. Mabel Jarrell of San
Antonio, Tex., and Mrs. Stella Dameron of Marfork.  Service will be at 2
p.m. tomorrow at Paxville Free Will Baptist Church with Rev Ernest Bias and
Rev. Kenna French officiating.  Burial
will be in Adkins Cemetery at Naoma.  The body will be taken to the home
at 3 p.m.  today.  Armstrong
Mortuary of Whitesville is in charge of arrangements.”

The funeral home book, in which the guests and friends sign, contains many
Raleigh Country surnames, as would be expected. Closer perusal finds my
grandparents and uncle–“Mr. & Mrs. Burton Peters &
Lloyd.”  There is also “Mr.
& Mrs. James Peters & family”–my father’s older brother, sister-in-law
Gwendolyn “Tootie” Jackson Kidd Peters, nieces Carolyn Jean and Sonja
Kay and nephew Ronald Gene.  There is
“Mamie Peters,” sister-in-law to my Grandpa Burton Peters.  There are more great uncles, aunts and
cousins listed: “Mr. & Mrs. Hughie Jarrell, Inez Stover, Mr. &
Mrs. Virgil Stover & Loretta, Mr. & Mrs. Cebert Stover & family,
Mr. & Mrs. Elmer Ashley.”

Other surnames included in the book are Mullins, Stilwell, Bowles, Chapman,
Spradling, Vergis, Canterbury & Lee.

Gracie, Herbert’s daughter, reads the book 50 years after the fact and puts a
unique spin on it, “He sure had a LOT of flowers, and a lot of people
signed the book.  He was 26 yrs, 8
months and 1 day old.  It seems a bit weird to see my name in here as his
daughter.”

The funeral service included the Packsville Freewill Baptist Church Choir’s
renditions of  “Peace in the Valley,” “Precious
Memories,” and “Will you Meet me Over Yonder?”  According to Herbert’s widow,
 Herbert’s mother Gracie Nicholas Stover, kissed Herbert and said, “I
will meet you in the morning.”   It
was a mother reassuring her son, telling him he was safe and that she would see
him in the morning when they wake up in heaven. Gracie P. Nicholas Stover also
sang gospel.  According to her
granddaughter Gracie, she “sang on some Christian program out of Oak
Hill.”

Judy Turner Griffy sent me the words to “I’ll Meet you in the
Morning.”  I feel it appropriate to
include one of the verses from this old hymn:

“I’ll meet you in the morning by the bright river side
When all sorrow has drifted away
I’ll be standing at the portals, when the gates open wide
At the close of life’s long dreary day.”

In the end, we are all measured by what we leave behind.  Some may look at the final product in terms
of dollars, since that is how they measure success.  I chose to take the approach of an amateur genealogist.  We are measured, I believe, by who we leave
behind.  An up-to-date account shows
that Herbert Jackson Stover left a wife, 2 children, 6 grandchildren and 11
great grandchildren.

I think that Uncle Herbert understood this amateur genealogist’s take on
success.  Gracie talked about one of her
conversations with Herbert’s sister and our Aunt Stella Stover Dameron,
“Aunt Stella told me, last time I saw her, that he always was talking
about his little boy and girl and that he loved me and my brother very
much.”  He was also described as a
“doting father” who “spent time playing and being with his
children.”  That sounds to me like
a man investing in the future and aiming toward success.

When I undertook this project, I wanted to find out everything I could about my
uncle since my information on him was scant at best.  For you see, he died before I was born, died before my parents
even knew each other.  I also wanted to
find something new about Uncle Herbert, something that Gracie didn’t even
know.  It was to be my present to her. I
sent my Uncle Lloyd Peters an E-mail, for he was a major source of information
on the Stover family. He would know something extra.  I would follow up the E-mail with a phone call later in the
week.  I instead got a phone call.  It was my cousin, Debbie Peters Milam,
informing me that Uncle Lloyd had died. 
I found nothing new about my Uncle Herbert.

But, I think I now know him a little better. 
Three things helped me toward this goal, helped me get a grip on just
who Uncle Herbert really was.  Beyond
the dates and the oral legend, this is what I know about Herbert Jackson
Stover.  First, I know my father thought
enough of him to mention him in a short letter written home from the cold hell
that was the Korean War.  Second, I know
my grandparents thought enough of him to take his widow and children in after
his untimely death.  And third, I know
his daughter Gracie, as many of you do.

I know Gracie as a kind and giving soul who is very passionate and thorough
about her work in genealogy.  Without
her dedication, many of us would be less informed about our families.   And that would be a tragedy.

I am proud to know her, proud to list her among my mentors and, most
especially, proud to call her cousin. 
In genealogy, a cousin is about as good as it gets and to paraphrase a
cliche, they don’t get any better than Gracie.

If we are measured, as I stated before, by who we leave behind, then Cousin
Gracie is a perfect example of just how successful my Uncle Herbert was.  And we are all richer because of his
success.

Sincerely,

Mike Peters
npeters102@aol.com

Victor E. Sullivan




VICTOR E. SULLIVAN

Biographical Sketches of Members of Congress, Members of the
Legislature, Officers of the State Governement and judges of

the Supreme Court of Appeals, West Virigina, 1917.

Source:

West Virginia Legislative Hand Book and Manual and Official
Register, 1917, Compiled and Edited by John T. Harris, Clerk

of the Senate, The Tribune Printing Co., Charleston, West

Va. pgs. 719 – 770

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

748


SULLIVAN, VICTOR E. (Republican.) Address: Raleigh,

West Va. Born at Powellsville, Scioto county, Ohio,

August 15, 1854; educated in the public schools of

Scioto and Gallia counties; has been a resident of West

Virginia fourteen years, locating first in Fayette county

and later in Raleigh; is a mining superintendent,

receiving his occupational experience in Ohio and West

Virginia; has been Chairman of the Republican Committee of

Raleigh county for five years; elected to the House in

1914; re-elected in 1916; in 1917 had the following
committee assignments: Prohibition and Temperance, Counties,

Districts and Municipal Corporations and Printing and

Contingent Expenses.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook

Email: vfcrook@trellis.net





George W. Bair







Bair Richmond Ford

George W. Bair

Written by George E. Honts, III (Fincastle, VA)

George W. Bair, Jr. was born November 10, 1875 at Washington College,
Tennessee, the son of George Bair and Mary Hinkle Beard. He came to Raleigh
County as a young man, with 50 cents in his pocket, that, in his words
“was all the money I had in this world”.  He worked, accumulated some
savings and acquired with his brother, Robert T. Bair, a sawmill and a
tract of fallen timber near the site of the present Beckley Civic Center. 
From these inconspicuous beginnings grew a thriving lumber business. 
The lumber business was conducted on the site of the present-day offices
of the Beckley Newspapers.  On December 20, 1897, he married Lucinda
Ellen Richmond of Raleigh County.

After the turn of the 20th Century, George Bair, again in partnership
with his brother, R.T., became the first Ford automobile dealers in southern
West Virginia.  Henry Ford shipped disassembled Model T Fords to Beckley
by rail where the Bair Brothers completed the assembly of the vehicles.
Later the Bair Brothers also sold Lincoln automobiles. The story is told
that Henry Ford once complained that the Bair brothers were not selling
enough Lincolns.  Upon receiving that word, George canvassed his neighbors
On North Kanawha Street, starting with Ashton File who lived across the
street, and by the end of the evening had sold six Lincolns.

In 1911 he built his home at 219 North Kanawha Street.  The house
still stands and presently houses an extension of Concord College. 
In 1922 the Bair Brothers completed the Bair building on North Kanawha.

George Bair served an unexpired term as mayor of Beckley, 1928-1929,
when Joe L. Smith was elected to Congress.  He chose not to stand
for re-election. He served as a director of the Raleigh County Bank and
president of the Cooperative Building and Loan Association. George and
Ellen had no children, but in 1911 adopted her twin nieces, Dora Louise
(1911-1947) and Nora Ellen (1911 – 1957), whose mother had died in childbirth.
Louise married George Edward Honts, Jr. of Botetourt County, Virginia and
was survived by him and one son.  Ethel did not marry.  George
Bair was a life-long Presbyterian: Ellen remained a member of the Christian
Church.  George Bair died in 1939.  He and Ellen are buried at
the mausoleum at Sunset cemetery. Beckley.

 


Fitzhugh Lee Banks







Banks

Fitzhugh Lee Banks

Written by Shirley File Robbins

Dr. Fitzhugh Lee Banks was born September 25, 1885 in Wolftown,
Virginia, the last of five children of James William and Cornelia Burnett
Banks. Educated at Randolph Macon Academy in Bedford, VA, and the Medical
College of Richmond, Class of 1909, he married Mary Boardman Smith, born
in Madison County, Virginia July 19, 1887, on October 19, 1910.  Mrs.
Banks was the daughter of Francis Percival Smith and Matilda Ella Simms.

Dr. Banks opened his first practice of medicine at Gordonsville, Orange

County, Virginia. Fitz and Mary’s three children, William Smith Banks

(1911), Francis McRae Banks (1913 – 1982), and Shirley Hamilton Banks
(1915 – 1990 ) were born there.

In 1922 Dr. Banks moved to West Virginia to become the company doctor
for the Slab Fork Coal Company.  Then, after practicing in Maben,
WV, he settled in Beckley as an Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat specialist. 
He had gone to New York City, living with a medical school classmate, to
be trained in that specialty. He received his 50 year pin from the Medical
College of Virginia in 1959. He had been in practice as a general practitioner
for 20 years, and an Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat Specialist for 30 years.

Dr. Banks was a member of the West Virginia Medical Association, the
Black Knight Country Club, The Elks Club, and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. 
He was known for his love of literature and history, particularly the Civil
War period, his passion for pike fishing, and stories of his ancestors. 
He was the great- great- great grandson of Dr. Thomas Walker and Joshua
Fry.  Dr. Walker was a physician, surveyor, explorer and statesman. 
He is known to have traveled the Raleigh County area in about 1750. 
He was also a guardian for Thomas Jefferson. Dr. Banks would tell that
with pride; most who heard the story thought he said “gardener for Thomas
Jefferson”.  Fitz, as he was called by family and friends, always
laughed at that comment.

He died in Richmond, Virginia on February 27, 1966.

 


Thomas E. Bibb







Bibb


The History of West Virginia, Old and New

Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,

Chicago and New York, Volume III,

pg. 366-367

Raleigh

THOMAS E. BIBB spent a score of years in the lumber and coal industry,
but finally turned all his energies and

his capital to merchandising and has built up in the Beckley Hardware
Company one of the most successful wholesale organizations in this rich
and populous section of the state.

Mr. Bibb was born in Fayette County, West Virginia, in August, 1865.
His grandfather Bibb was born and reared in Amherst County, Virginia, moved
to West Virginia about 1830, and served in the Civil war. He married a
Miss Gatewood, of English ancestry. One of their sons was Rev. Martin Bibb,
widely known all over the South as a minister of the Baptist Church. Thomas
E. Bibb’s parents were Benjamin and Mary (Wilson) Bibb, natives of Virginia.
His father, who was a farmer and school teacher, served for sixteen years
as superintendent of schools of Fayette County, and is still living, at
the age of eighty-four.

Thomas E. Bibb acquired all his education in Fayette County, and his
father was his chief teacher. He left

school at the age of twenty and went to work on the farm, then engaged
in the lumber and timber business, and for seventeen years was connected
with the coal industry as sales agent at Rush Run and Royal in Raleigh
County. He then returned to the lumber industry for three years, and in
1910 located at Beckley and established the Beckley Hardware and Furniture
Company. His business is now the largest wholesale house in this great
coal district, and there is no larger house nearer than Charleston.

On April 10, 1888, in Fayette County, Mr. Bibb married Ella M. Love,
daughter of S. H. and Lucy (Dickerson)

Love, both of Fayette County, where her father was a farmer and school
teacher. Mr. and Mrs. Bibb have reared an interesting family. There were
six children, Edgar E., Carlyn A., Mildred, James B. and Clarence. Harry
is deceased. The two sons, Edgar and Carlyn, have become actively associated
with their father in business, and both are sterling young business men
and citizens of Beckley.  Edgar married Ella Campbell, daughter of
a former sheriff of Raleigh County.  Carlyn, who is unmarried, is
road salesman for the Beckley Hardware Company. In October, 1917, he entered
Camp Leo for training, was sent for a time to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and then
returned to Camp Lee, and in June, 1918, went overseas. For six weeks he
was in the Argonne Forest fighting.

Mr. Bibb is a Baptist, is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason and
Shriner, and his sons Edgar and

Carlyn are also Masons and Shriners. In politics he is a democrat.
The family are prominent socially in Beckley.

 

In 1914, at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, he married Miss Nellie King, daughter
of Robert and Naomi King, of Beck-

ley. Their two children are John B., Jr., and Ruth. Mr. Clifton is
a Presbyterian, a member of the Masonic Lodge, the Kiwanis Club and in
politics is a democrat.

 

Submitted by Valerie Crook

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Rebecca Jane Clay




Rebecca Jane Clay Cantley



This article was reproduced with the punctuation
and
capitalization used by the original author.

Transcribed by Jo Alice Bradley
Heck

    

Obituary


       
Rebecca Jane Clay, daughter
of Charles L. and Awry Clay, was born in Pike county Kentucky June 25, 1828.
When but a baby her parents left their Kentucky home, and came to Wyoming
county, W. Va., to make a new home in the Mountain State, and as this home
was being built, one by one, sisters and brothers were added to the family
until there were four boys and six girls.
        During this home life in Wyoming county,
the subject of this sketch, then a little girl of twelve years, at a camp
meeting held in their community, heard and heeded the call of Jesus Christ
to “Follow Me,” and then and there accepted and publicly confessed Him as
her Savior, and united with the Methodist church and began the christian life.
        After living in Wyoming county some
eighteen years, her parents sought a new home, coming to Raleigh county and
locating at Brackenridge. While living there another sister and brother came
into the home. Brackenridge was their home but four years when they moved
to Sand Lick where they made their home until death, August 1, 1852.
        While living at Brackenridge, the
subject of this sketch, Rebecca, the oldest daughter, was married to James
Cantley, and they spent the first two years of their married life at the
Cottle place, now better known as Saxon. While living here their first child,
Nettie J., was born. They next for a part of one year at what is now known
as the old flats, and during their brief stay there they were blessed with
the second baby Nancy Jane.
        From that place they moved to the
present home, where Mrs. Cantley spent the rest of her days. Two other children
came to live in this little family, Ellen and James. Ellen, however, after
four years, went to live with him Him who said, “Suffer the Little Children
to Come Unto Me.”
         When Lincoln issued the call
for 75,000 volunteers in 1861, James Cantley responded to that call, left
his faithful wife and beloved little ones to go out never to return for in
the battle of Cross Keys, Sheandoah Valley, Va., he received a wound that
soon proved fatal. He was taken to the Harrisburg hospital, and after ten
days started for home, getting as far as Cumberland, Md., where his strength
failed, and he departed this life and was buried at that place.
        Mrs. Cantley, now a widow with the
three little ones, took up the battle of life, with its toils and bravely
met the responsibilities, doing as best she could-trusting always in Him to
whom she had yielded her life as a child. Her friends and neighbors pay her
the splendid tribute of calling her a good, kind christian woman. She departed
this life “looking unto Jesus, the Beginner and Finisher of her faith,” on
May 26, 1910, aged 81 years, 11 months and 1 day, leaving to morn their loss,
two daughters, one son, sisters, brothers, twenty grand-children, thirty-one
great-grand-children, and many other relatives as well as a great host of
friends.

G. A. Reaugh