Category Archives: Greenbrier

William Francis Mcclung

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM FRANCIS McCLUNG – owner of 130 acres of land in Blue Sulphur district,
is farming some portion of the land, and grazes twenty head of cattle yearly.
He was born in Greenbrier County, June 21, 1833, and his first wife was Martha M.
GEORGE, daughter of William GEORGE of this county, and was born May 28, 1840, and
died September 17, 1877. Their children were: Allie J., born June 10, 1862, lives
at home; Lulu R., August 18, 1864, is a school teacher, living at home;
Elizabeth C., June 26, 1867, lives at home; Walter G., April 18, 1871, died
July 18, same year; Joseph F., July 18, 1873, is at home. The grandfather of
Martha M. GEORGE was Thomas GEORGE, who built the first house in Grassy Meadows,
and whose hunting exploits are elsewhere given. The paternal grandfather of
William F. McCLUNG was also a noted hunter and prominent among the early
settlers of Greenbrier County. Samuel and Jane (KINCAID) McCLUNG, who were
born in Greenbrier County, were the parents of William F. His father is still
living at Grassy Meadows, his mother died in 1846. In Greenbrier County,
March 23, 1880, William F. McCLUNG was joined in marriage with Martha S.
FEAMSTER, who was born in this county, March 17, 1840. William and Mary
(TYREE) FEAMSTER were her parents. Her father, born in Greenbrier County,
is still a resident here, with post office address at Asbury; her mother
was born in Fayette County, now West Virginia, and died in February, 1877.
W. F. McCLUNG may be addressed at Palestine, Greenbrier County,
West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie F. Crook, , 1999.

William Hampton Caldwell

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM HAMPTON CALDWELL, M. D. – was born in Lewisburg, Greenbrier
County, May 10, 1858, a son of Dewit Clinton Bolivar CALDWELL and Sarah
Jane CALDWELL, and a grandson of Joseph Franklin and Ann (TYLER) CALDWELL.
Dr. Joseph F. CALDWELL, his grandfather, came to Greenbrier County in
1820, and in Lewisburg established the first newspaper published west
of the Blue Ridge, in the same year – The Palladium of Virginia. He
also established the first stage lines through the State, from Lewisburg
to New Bern, North Carolina, and Guyandotte, Charleston, etc. This was
in 1837 or 1838, the mails prior to that date having been carried by a
man on horseback. He was a member of the West Virginia legislature in
1867, and introduced a bill relative to incorporation limits of Lewisburg.
He was mayor of Lewisburg, president of the board of registration, and
always a citizen prominent in the interest of the town, county, and
State. Dr. H. Clay CALDWELL, son of Dr. J. F. CALDWELL, was assistant
surgeon in the navy for several years, being promoted to full surgeon
a year or two previous to his death, which occurred while home on leave
of absence at the residence of his father, in Lewisburg, December 1,
1859, in the 28th year of his age. He was a young man of brilliant
promise, of very superior mind, and an honor to his profession. The
father of William H., also a physician, was justice of the peace, clerk
of the county court of Greenbrier County, and also United States
examining surgeon for West Virginia. William H. CALDWELL, in addition
to his professional duties, has held the seal of notary in and for
Greenbrier County for the past two years. His residence is in Lewisburg
District, and he owns the “Stone House”, at River Dale, on the Greenbrier
River – one of the first houses built in the county, erected and owned by
Benjamin GRIGSBY, a Presbyterian minister and pioneer of the county. His
address is: Dr. W. H. CALDWELL, Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West
Virginia.

Submitted by Valerie Crook
Email: vfcrook @trellis.net 1999.

William Henry Mcclung

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM HENRY McCLUNG, M. D. – born in Meadow Bluff District, Greenbrier County,
October 28, 1843, and Adaline Elizabeth THOMPSON, born in the
same district April 30, 1843, were there joined in wedlock, on the 15th
of November, 1866. Banzesa, born July 28, 1867, died August 13th following
was their first-born child. In their home are four: Irene Irvin, born
July 28, 1871; Elsie Bird, July 13, 1874; Olive Belle, December 28, 1875;
Willie Kenna, November 19, 1880. The parents of Dr. McCLUNG, are Alexander
and Elenor (THOMPSON) McCLUNG, of Greenbrier County the former born in 1805,
and the latter in 1815. Adaline E., wife of Dr. McCLUNG, was
daughter of Isaac and Jane (BURNS) THOMPSON. Her father died in this county,
March 13, 1876, and her mother is still a resident here. Dr. McCLUNG served
as clerk of the board of registration 1866, and was at the same time member
of the board of supervisors. He was elected representative from Greenbrier County
in 1882, and was elected deputy sheriff in October, 1881. He volunteered
for service in the Confederate army in 1861,and was with Buchart’s company until
that disbanded, when he joined the Greenbrier Cavalry, Company K. He was
promoted to lieutenant and drill master in Honshell’s battalion, and took
part in all the battles of his command. He was three times wounded, twice
severely, first at Frederick City, Maryland, then in front of the “Block-house”
at Washington, while trying to take his wounded brother, John McCLUNG, off the
field. He was captured in Ninevah, but escaped by riding through the Federal
lines, and swimming the Shenandoah river three times, then taking to the
mountains, reaching his command the next evening. He served until the close
of the war. Dr. McCLUNG owns a fine farm on Meadow River, and has been for
twenty years a successful practitioner. His post office address is Meadow
Bluff, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie F. Crook, , 1999.

William Page Scott

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM PAGE SCOTT — is a son of William Hoover SCOTT and Elizabeth Jane (HILL)
SCOTT, both natives of this county. He was born in Greenbrier County, October 24,
1846 was raised in this county, and in Lewisburg is engaged in the livery business.
His business card appears elsewhere in these pages. In Alleghany County, Virginia,
May 18, 1870, Laura Bell BEARD became the wife of William P. SCOTT, and to them
five children were born: Lillian Brown April 13, 1871; Lucy P., February 25 1873;
Andrew E. August 22, 1875. Samuel F., December 7, 1876; Julia G., July 7,
1881. Samuel F. is deceased and the others living with their father. The wife
and mother departed this life March 18, 1882. She was born in Greenbrier
County, September 18, 1852 daughter of Andrew and Eliza (BROWN) BEARD, both
now deceased. The father and three brothers of Mr. SCOTT were Confederate
soldiers in the war between the States, and two of the brothers, Thomas and
Frank died of the measles while in the service. William P. SCOTT’s post office
address is Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1998.

William R. Livesay

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM R. LIVESAY – owns a farm in Lewisburg District of 1,500 acres of Blue
Grass land, well watered and stocked. He is also the owner of LIVESAY Mill,
on the Lewisburg and Williamsburg pike. His birth was in Falling Spring District,
this county, January 6, 1817, and all his life has been passed here. He has
been one year president of the board of supervisors and two years justice of
the peace. May 5, 1855, in this county he married Ann Elizabeth PATTERSON,
and they had two sons: George, born May 5, 1857, died January 7, 1858;
William Crawford, born July 12, 1860, lives at home, engaged in farming.
Ann E., wife of Mr. LIVESAY, was born in Augusta County, Virginia, came to
Greenbrier County about the age of twelve years, and died on her husband’s
farm July 19, 1862. She was a daughter of John and Jane (CRAWFORD) PATTERSON,
and her parents, natives of Augusta County, are deceased. Her father died in
Augusta County, and her mother in Charlottesville, Virginia. September 8,
1864, William R. LIVESAY married Elizabeth Groves HERN, who was born in Augusta
County, Virginia, May 28, 1829. She was a daughter of Joseph and Barbara
(STRICKLER) HERN, who came to Greenbrier County when she was a girl, and
died in this county, her father on the 7th of July, 1869, and her mother
on the 20th of March, 1873. Joseph HERN was born in Shenandoah County,
Virginia, in 1787, and Barbara, his wife, was born in Rockingham County,
Virginia, October 7, 1797. William R. LIVESAY, who was born near Blue Sulphur,
this county, December 14, 1780, and in Pocahontas County married Mary SWITZER,
who was born on Little Levels, Pocahontas County, August 3, 1786. They resided
in Greenbrier County until death, and both died on the farm now owned by William R.
George LIVESAY died March 21, 1865, and his wife died February 26, 1857.
The brothers and sisters of William R. LIVESAY were Thomas, John, Rebecca,
Andrew, Joseph, Elizabeth, Allen, Melinda Mary, Washington, Lucinda, and
Harvey. William R. LIVESAY’s postoffice address is Richlands, Greenbrier
County, West Virginia.

Submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

William Parks Rucker

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM PARKS RUCKER – attorney and farmer, has been a resident in Greenbrier
County since 1869. He was born in Lynchburg, Campbell County, Virginia, November
9, 1831, son of Clifton Hedley RUCKER and Mary Jane Stark (STAPLES) RUCKER, now
both deceased. His father, born in Amherst County, Virginia, died in that county,
and his mother, born in Appomattox County, Virginia, died in Lynchburg. In Campbell
County, Virginia, October 28, 1852, were recorded the marriage vows of William Parks
RUCKER and Margaret Ann SCOTT, and the children of their union are recorded;
Hedley Scott, born September 13, 1853, lives in Huntersville, West Virginia;
W. W., February 1, 1855, lives in Keytesville, Missouri, as does James S.,
born November 23, 1856; Mary Clifton, born July 22, 1858, died September 28, 1861;
Edgar Parks, born December 23, 1861, lives in Rothville, Missouri. Thomas Hazlewood
SCOTT, born in Campbell County, Virginia, and Margaret Parks (BURKS) SCOTT, born in
Amherst County, Virginia, were the parents of Margret A., born in Campbell County,
January 31, 1832. Her parents both died in the county of her birth. In 1867-8, in
Nicholas county, West Virginia, William P. RUCKER filled the office of justice of
peace: in 1865-7 he was a notary public in and for the same county. In the years
1870-2 he was prosecuting attorney for Greenbrier and Pocahontas Counties. He was
major of the 13th West Virginia Infantry (Federal), but never served with the
regiment, being assigned alternately aid-de-camp with Generals Seigel and Crook.
His residence and post office address are Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

Samuel J. Smith

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

SAMUEL J. SMITH — was born in Louisa County, Virginia, in 1839, and was married
in that State and county, October 25 1858. His wife is Parmelia F. SMITH, born
in Louisa County in 1839, and the three living children of their union are:
N. F., born January 9 1861; and F. B., born May 18, 1866; J. I., born October
27 1874. Laura M., born August 30, 1859, now deceased was the first born of
five children of Mr. and Mrs. SMITH. Robert K. and Elvira T. (GIBSON) SMITH,
parents of Samuel J., were Virginians, his fathers born in Hanover County in
1800 and his mother in Louisa County in 1806. His father died in the last-named
county in 1876. His mother is still a resident of that county. James C. SMITH,
born in King and Queen County, Virginia, August 16, 1800 and Adelia M. (HOPKINS)
SMITH, born in Caroline County, Virginia, March 22 1801, were the parents of
Mrs. SMITH. Both died in Louisa County, Virginia, her father in 1864, and her
mother in 1872. Samuel J. SMITH was four years captain in the Louisa County
militia, 1857-60. He entered the Confederate service during the war between
the States, and was three years a member of the 56th Virginia Infantry. His
brother served in the same army, under “Stonewall” Jackson and was killed but
a short time before that lamented general fell, in the fight near Fredericksburg,
in 1863. In 1876, Samuel J. SMITH came to Greenbrier County, and is established
in a general mercantile business at Lewisburg, which is his place of residence
and post office address.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1998.

Samuel Price

“The History of West Virginia, Old and New”
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume II, pg. 626

GOVERNOR SAMUEL PRICE, of Lewisburg, one of the distinguished men of
his generation in the two Virginias, was lieutenant governor of Virginia
during the war between the states.
He was born July 28, 1805, in Fauquier County, Virginia, on the
maternal side being a descendant of a prominent Revolutionary officer,
Major Morris of New Jersey. His mother was Mary Clymann. His father,
Samuel Price, moved from New Jersey to Fauquier County with his parents,
and in 1815 he established a home in Preston County, in what is now West
Virginia. Governor Samuel Price was reared in Preston County, acquired
his primary education in old Virginia, and studied law with Judge Hason
at Paris, Kentucky. He returned to Virginia and took the census of
Nicholas County in 1830, in 1831 was elected clerk of court for that
county in 1832 was admitted to the bar at Summersville. He was elected
prosecuting attorney in 1833, was chosen for the Legislature in 1834
and re-elected for two succeeding years. While in the Legislature he
introduced an important bill providing for the building of the
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. In 1836 he moved to Wheeling, but
subsequently established his home in Greenbrier County. At that time the
sessions of the Federal District Court, the Supreme Court of appeals,
the Circuit and County Courts were held at Lewisburg, one of the most
important judicial centers of the Virginias. In the intensely competitive
field of this court town, where some of the greatest lawyers of the time
gathered, he held his own and was regarded as the peer of any who
practiced there.
Vice President Henry Wilson estimated Samuel Price as “the best land
lawyer in the two Virginias.” In 1847 he was elected representative from
Greenbrier County, and was in the Legislature four years. He was a
member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1850-51 and again in
1860-61. He opposed secession, but sided with his state when it went
into the Confederacy. He was elected lieutenant governor of Virginia,
and held that office until the close of the war. In 1865 he was elected
circuit judge, but declined to qualify.
Governor Price was a member of the Constitutional Convention of West
Virginia in 1872, and was chosen president of the convention. His last
important public service was his appointment to the United States Senate,
following the death of Allen T. Caperton. He served in that body from
December 4, 1876, to January 31, 1877.
On February 8, 1837, Governor Samuel Price married Jane Stuart,
daughter of Lewis Stuart and granddaughter of Col. John Stuart of
Greenbrier County. A brief account of the distinguished Stuart family of
old Greenbrier is contained in another article. Governor and Mrs. Stuart
had nine children, three of whom died young. Mary married J. C.
Alderson. Margaret Lynn is deceased. John S. married Susan McElhenney,
and died about twenty-five years ago, his surviving daughter being the
wife of John C. Dice. Sallie Lewis became the wife of John A. Preston,
and is survived by two sons, who are individually mentioned elsewhere in
this publication. The fifth of the children is Samuel Lewis Price.
Jennie Stuart Price lives at Lewisburg. Samuel Lewis Price was born July
10, 1850, was reared at Lewisburg, attended private schools, and in 1860
went to Kansas. He taught school in Doniphan County and for a time
farmed there, but sold his interests and after a year returned to
Lewisburg. His life for a half a century has been largely devoted to
farming and stock raising, and he is also interested in coal properties
in the state. His home is the oldest house in Greenbrier County, the
large stone house erected by his great-grandfather Col. John Stuart, in
1789. On the same property is another stone building, now used as an
office and which, as stated elsewhere, was the first office of the
clerk of Greenbrier County.
October 23, 1878, Samuel Lewis Price married Mary A. McCue, of
Augusta County, Virginia. Seven children were born to their marriage:
Elizabeth W.; Samuel, a lawyer at Lewisburg; Jane Stuart; Sallie Lewis,
wife of Prof. W. W. Wood, of Davidson, North Carolina; Edward Clayton,
who died while nearly qualified to graduate at the University of
Virginia; Mary McCue, a graduate of Columbia University, who served
as a nurse during the World war; and Thomas Lewis, of Lewisburg. Samuel
L. Price is an elder in the Presbyterian Church and an active member
of the Masonic fraternity.

Submitted by: Valerie Crook 1999
Email: vfcrook@trellis.net

Sarah C. Lowry

Source: Unknown. This biography was from a photocopy from a book that also
listed other doctors from the Gallia County/Lawrence County, Ohio, area.

Sarah C. Lowry.

Sarah C. Lowry, M. D., began to read medicine in 1892 and entered the Ohio
Medical University the following year taking a two year course at that institution.
She entered the Laura Memorial Medical College for Women at Cincinnati, September,
1895, where she graduated in April, 1896. Since this time she has been actively
engaged in the practice of her profession at Ironton and her ability, as
particularly shown in handling the cases of women and children, is bringing
her rapidly tot he front ranks among her professional associates as well as
the public generally. Dr. Sarah C. Lowry is a native of Greenbriar county,
West Virginia, but from infancy has resided in this state. Her office is
located at 180 Mulberry street, Ironton, Ohio.

Submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

Simeon R. Huffman

SIMEON R. HUFFMAN – has lived over thirty-seven years on his homestead
farm of 335 acres, in Blue Sulphur district, Greenbrier County, and has
it nearly all improved and under cultivation. On Snake Run he has 60 or
70 acres of mountain land, mostly in timber. He was elected treasurer of
schools for this district, and served from 1867 to 1869. He served eighteen
months as magistrate, also. His birth was in Blue Sulphur district,
October 19, 1822, and he married in Monroe County, then Virginia, February
26, 1846 His wife was Bellicent GWINN, born in Monroe County, December 2, 1819,
and their children were four, of whom two only survive: William, born March
18, 1847, died October 7. 1862; Mary, born February 13, 1857, died
August 2, 1859. At home with the parents are: John, born September
23, 1849, and George, born January 21, 1854. Enos HUFFMAN, father of
Simeon R., was born in the Shenandoah Valley, August 15, 1793, and was
quite a boy when his mother brought her family from the valley to
Greenbrier County. Afterward she moved to Preble County, Ohio, with all
her family except Enos, who remained in this county, and married Jane
GEORGE, born in this district, October 25, 1794. She was a daughter of
Thomas GEORGE, who settled here in 1790, and was a great hunter. He killed
many bear and deer, and used to capture wolves and pen them in a corn-crib,
where at one time he had seven. Enos HUFFMAN died in Indiana, April 19, 1856,
and his widow still lives in Blue Sulphur district. Joseph and Mary
(TAYLOR) GWINN, the parents of Mrs. HUFFMAN, died in Monroe County,
the father on the 23d of April, 1862, and the mother June 23, 1872.
Joseph GWINN was Born in Monroe County, November 6, 1783, and his wife
was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, May 15, 1786. Simeon R. HUFFMAN’s
postoffice address is Palestine, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.