Category Archives: Greenbrier

William R. Livesay

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM R. LIVESAY – owns a farm in Lewisburg District of 1,500 acres of Blue
Grass land, well watered and stocked. He is also the owner of LIVESAY Mill,
on the Lewisburg and Williamsburg pike. His birth was in Falling Spring District,
this county, January 6, 1817, and all his life has been passed here. He has
been one year president of the board of supervisors and two years justice of
the peace. May 5, 1855, in this county he married Ann Elizabeth PATTERSON,
and they had two sons: George, born May 5, 1857, died January 7, 1858;
William Crawford, born July 12, 1860, lives at home, engaged in farming.
Ann E., wife of Mr. LIVESAY, was born in Augusta County, Virginia, came to
Greenbrier County about the age of twelve years, and died on her husband’s
farm July 19, 1862. She was a daughter of John and Jane (CRAWFORD) PATTERSON,
and her parents, natives of Augusta County, are deceased. Her father died in
Augusta County, and her mother in Charlottesville, Virginia. September 8,
1864, William R. LIVESAY married Elizabeth Groves HERN, who was born in Augusta
County, Virginia, May 28, 1829. She was a daughter of Joseph and Barbara
(STRICKLER) HERN, who came to Greenbrier County when she was a girl, and
died in this county, her father on the 7th of July, 1869, and her mother
on the 20th of March, 1873. Joseph HERN was born in Shenandoah County,
Virginia, in 1787, and Barbara, his wife, was born in Rockingham County,
Virginia, October 7, 1797. William R. LIVESAY, who was born near Blue Sulphur,
this county, December 14, 1780, and in Pocahontas County married Mary SWITZER,
who was born on Little Levels, Pocahontas County, August 3, 1786. They resided
in Greenbrier County until death, and both died on the farm now owned by William R.
George LIVESAY died March 21, 1865, and his wife died February 26, 1857.
The brothers and sisters of William R. LIVESAY were Thomas, John, Rebecca,
Andrew, Joseph, Elizabeth, Allen, Melinda Mary, Washington, Lucinda, and
Harvey. William R. LIVESAY’s postoffice address is Richlands, Greenbrier
County, West Virginia.

Submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

William Parks Rucker

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM PARKS RUCKER – attorney and farmer, has been a resident in Greenbrier
County since 1869. He was born in Lynchburg, Campbell County, Virginia, November
9, 1831, son of Clifton Hedley RUCKER and Mary Jane Stark (STAPLES) RUCKER, now
both deceased. His father, born in Amherst County, Virginia, died in that county,
and his mother, born in Appomattox County, Virginia, died in Lynchburg. In Campbell
County, Virginia, October 28, 1852, were recorded the marriage vows of William Parks
RUCKER and Margaret Ann SCOTT, and the children of their union are recorded;
Hedley Scott, born September 13, 1853, lives in Huntersville, West Virginia;
W. W., February 1, 1855, lives in Keytesville, Missouri, as does James S.,
born November 23, 1856; Mary Clifton, born July 22, 1858, died September 28, 1861;
Edgar Parks, born December 23, 1861, lives in Rothville, Missouri. Thomas Hazlewood
SCOTT, born in Campbell County, Virginia, and Margaret Parks (BURKS) SCOTT, born in
Amherst County, Virginia, were the parents of Margret A., born in Campbell County,
January 31, 1832. Her parents both died in the county of her birth. In 1867-8, in
Nicholas county, West Virginia, William P. RUCKER filled the office of justice of
peace: in 1865-7 he was a notary public in and for the same county. In the years
1870-2 he was prosecuting attorney for Greenbrier and Pocahontas Counties. He was
major of the 13th West Virginia Infantry (Federal), but never served with the
regiment, being assigned alternately aid-de-camp with Generals Seigel and Crook.
His residence and post office address are Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

William Francis Mcclung

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM FRANCIS McCLUNG – owner of 130 acres of land in Blue Sulphur district,
is farming some portion of the land, and grazes twenty head of cattle yearly.
He was born in Greenbrier County, June 21, 1833, and his first wife was Martha M.
GEORGE, daughter of William GEORGE of this county, and was born May 28, 1840, and
died September 17, 1877. Their children were: Allie J., born June 10, 1862, lives
at home; Lulu R., August 18, 1864, is a school teacher, living at home;
Elizabeth C., June 26, 1867, lives at home; Walter G., April 18, 1871, died
July 18, same year; Joseph F., July 18, 1873, is at home. The grandfather of
Martha M. GEORGE was Thomas GEORGE, who built the first house in Grassy Meadows,
and whose hunting exploits are elsewhere given. The paternal grandfather of
William F. McCLUNG was also a noted hunter and prominent among the early
settlers of Greenbrier County. Samuel and Jane (KINCAID) McCLUNG, who were
born in Greenbrier County, were the parents of William F. His father is still
living at Grassy Meadows, his mother died in 1846. In Greenbrier County,
March 23, 1880, William F. McCLUNG was joined in marriage with Martha S.
FEAMSTER, who was born in this county, March 17, 1840. William and Mary
(TYREE) FEAMSTER were her parents. Her father, born in Greenbrier County,
is still a resident here, with post office address at Asbury; her mother
was born in Fayette County, now West Virginia, and died in February, 1877.
W. F. McCLUNG may be addressed at Palestine, Greenbrier County,
West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie F. Crook, , 1999.

William Hampton Caldwell

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM HAMPTON CALDWELL, M. D. – was born in Lewisburg, Greenbrier
County, May 10, 1858, a son of Dewit Clinton Bolivar CALDWELL and Sarah
Jane CALDWELL, and a grandson of Joseph Franklin and Ann (TYLER) CALDWELL.
Dr. Joseph F. CALDWELL, his grandfather, came to Greenbrier County in
1820, and in Lewisburg established the first newspaper published west
of the Blue Ridge, in the same year – The Palladium of Virginia. He
also established the first stage lines through the State, from Lewisburg
to New Bern, North Carolina, and Guyandotte, Charleston, etc. This was
in 1837 or 1838, the mails prior to that date having been carried by a
man on horseback. He was a member of the West Virginia legislature in
1867, and introduced a bill relative to incorporation limits of Lewisburg.
He was mayor of Lewisburg, president of the board of registration, and
always a citizen prominent in the interest of the town, county, and
State. Dr. H. Clay CALDWELL, son of Dr. J. F. CALDWELL, was assistant
surgeon in the navy for several years, being promoted to full surgeon
a year or two previous to his death, which occurred while home on leave
of absence at the residence of his father, in Lewisburg, December 1,
1859, in the 28th year of his age. He was a young man of brilliant
promise, of very superior mind, and an honor to his profession. The
father of William H., also a physician, was justice of the peace, clerk
of the county court of Greenbrier County, and also United States
examining surgeon for West Virginia. William H. CALDWELL, in addition
to his professional duties, has held the seal of notary in and for
Greenbrier County for the past two years. His residence is in Lewisburg
District, and he owns the “Stone House”, at River Dale, on the Greenbrier
River – one of the first houses built in the county, erected and owned by
Benjamin GRIGSBY, a Presbyterian minister and pioneer of the county. His
address is: Dr. W. H. CALDWELL, Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West
Virginia.

Submitted by Valerie Crook
Email: vfcrook @trellis.net 1999.

William Henry Mcclung

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM HENRY McCLUNG, M. D. – born in Meadow Bluff District, Greenbrier County,
October 28, 1843, and Adaline Elizabeth THOMPSON, born in the
same district April 30, 1843, were there joined in wedlock, on the 15th
of November, 1866. Banzesa, born July 28, 1867, died August 13th following
was their first-born child. In their home are four: Irene Irvin, born
July 28, 1871; Elsie Bird, July 13, 1874; Olive Belle, December 28, 1875;
Willie Kenna, November 19, 1880. The parents of Dr. McCLUNG, are Alexander
and Elenor (THOMPSON) McCLUNG, of Greenbrier County the former born in 1805,
and the latter in 1815. Adaline E., wife of Dr. McCLUNG, was
daughter of Isaac and Jane (BURNS) THOMPSON. Her father died in this county,
March 13, 1876, and her mother is still a resident here. Dr. McCLUNG served
as clerk of the board of registration 1866, and was at the same time member
of the board of supervisors. He was elected representative from Greenbrier County
in 1882, and was elected deputy sheriff in October, 1881. He volunteered
for service in the Confederate army in 1861,and was with Buchart’s company until
that disbanded, when he joined the Greenbrier Cavalry, Company K. He was
promoted to lieutenant and drill master in Honshell’s battalion, and took
part in all the battles of his command. He was three times wounded, twice
severely, first at Frederick City, Maryland, then in front of the “Block-house”
at Washington, while trying to take his wounded brother, John McCLUNG, off the
field. He was captured in Ninevah, but escaped by riding through the Federal
lines, and swimming the Shenandoah river three times, then taking to the
mountains, reaching his command the next evening. He served until the close
of the war. Dr. McCLUNG owns a fine farm on Meadow River, and has been for
twenty years a successful practitioner. His post office address is Meadow
Bluff, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie F. Crook, , 1999.

William Page Scott

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

WILLIAM PAGE SCOTT — is a son of William Hoover SCOTT and Elizabeth Jane (HILL)
SCOTT, both natives of this county. He was born in Greenbrier County, October 24,
1846 was raised in this county, and in Lewisburg is engaged in the livery business.
His business card appears elsewhere in these pages. In Alleghany County, Virginia,
May 18, 1870, Laura Bell BEARD became the wife of William P. SCOTT, and to them
five children were born: Lillian Brown April 13, 1871; Lucy P., February 25 1873;
Andrew E. August 22, 1875. Samuel F., December 7, 1876; Julia G., July 7,
1881. Samuel F. is deceased and the others living with their father. The wife
and mother departed this life March 18, 1882. She was born in Greenbrier
County, September 18, 1852 daughter of Andrew and Eliza (BROWN) BEARD, both
now deceased. The father and three brothers of Mr. SCOTT were Confederate
soldiers in the war between the States, and two of the brothers, Thomas and
Frank died of the measles while in the service. William P. SCOTT’s post office
address is Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia.

Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1998.

Samuel H. Austin

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

SAMUEL H. AUSTIN, M. D. – born in Augusta County, Virginia, March 18, 1840,
took up residence in Greenbrier County in 1865. In the same year, on
the 28th of June, in Lewisburg, he was united in marriage with Mary C.
McPHERSON, and to them in the years that have ensued have been born
seven children: Amanda J., April 28, 1866; Mary A., March 4, 1868;
Addie L., July 9, 1871; Samuel Mc., July 11, 1873; Charlie V., October
4, 1875; Erle H., March 10, 1881; Hale B., December 14, 1882 – all are
at home. The birth of Mrs. AUSTIN was in Lewisburg, and she is a daughter
of Joel and Amanda (McCLUNG) McPHERSON. Her father was born in Fauquier
County, Virginia, in October 1807, and came to Greenbrier County in 1828,
and her mother was born in this county, July 4, 1808. The parents of
Dr. AUSTIN were natives of Augusta County, Virginia, and are now residents
in Harrison County, West Virginia. Alexander M. AUSTIN, his father, was
born January 3, 1803, and his mother, whose maiden name was Mary L.
HUNTER, was born in October, 1808. Samuel H. AUSTIN was four years in
the Confederate army, the first two years as lieutenant in Company B,
22nd Virginia Infantry, and the last two as assistant surgeon of the
20th Virginia Cavalry. He was in the battle of Lewisburg, in May, 1862,
and of Winchester, September 19, 1864, and others. He graduated in
medicine from the Virginia Medical College in March, 1866, and has been
practicing ever since. Since 1881 he has been United States examining
surgeon at Lewisburg, and he is serving his second term of three years
as school commissioner at Lewisburg, his place of residence and address.

Submitted by Valerie Crook
Email: vfcrook @trellis.net 1999

Samuel H. Doss

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

SAMUEL H. DOSS – was born in Franklin County, Virginia, October 2,
1853, but his home has been in Greenbrier County since he was twelve years old.
His parents were James and Ann (WEST) DOSS, both natives of Pennsylvania County,
Virginia, his father born in August, 1814, and his mother June 11, 1815. His
mother died in Franklin County, Virginia, July 22, 1865, and his father is
still a resident in Pittsylvania County. The brothers and sisters of Samuel H. DOSS,
who are living are: Christopher C., in Minnesota; Chalihill T. and
Mary A. in Summers County, this State, and Tabitha W., Cornelia V. and
Elizabeth J. in Greenbrier County. His brother James L. died April 29, 1870,
and his brother Lewis P. died October 16, 1873. Christopher C. served in the
Confederate Army from Pittsylvania County, James L. was a member of Dunn’s
Battalion, and Lewis P. a member of the Franklin County Cavalry. In Meadow Bluff
district, Greenbrier County, August 12, 1879, Samuel H. DOSS wedded Ledonia V.
WELCH, who was born in Greenbrier County, March 21, 1859. Robert A. and Margaret
A. (NICKELL) WELCH were her parents, her father born in Greenbrier County, and
her mother in Missouri. Her father is still living in this county, and her
mother died April 9, 1878. The two children of Mr. and Mrs. DOSS, born at the
foot of Little Sewell Mountain, are: Norma V., born May 27, 188O; W. Clarence,
February 15, 1882. Samuel H. DOSS has been selling goods in this county since
his start in life, and now charge of a store at Blue Sulphur Springs, which is
his post office address. His business card is elsewhere given.

Submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.

Samuel H00Ver

SAMUEL H00VER – born in Garrett County, Maryland, December 15, 1842, has been a
resident in Greenbrier County since August 1, 1881, and is a farmer and blacksmith
in Fort Spring District. He is a son of Carlyle H00VER, born in Somerset County,
Pennsylvania, and Rosanna (DURST) H00VER, born in Garrett County, Maryland.
His wife, whom he married in Grantsville, Maryland, was Rachel A. RECKNER and
her birth was in Garrett County, Maryland. Her parents were natives of that State,
John and Barbara E. (Potter) RECKNER. The children of Mr. and Mrs. H00VER, all
at home are: Lucretia E., born November 17, 1867; Fannie B., May 20, 1870;
Ralph R., October 13, 1874; Clara V., April 23, 1877; John Franklin and
Nathaniel W., May 10, 1879. Samuel H00VER was made prisoner by the Confederate
troops on the 3d of January, 1862, and was sent first to Libby prison, thence to
Belle Isle, where he remained two months, and was then sent to Andersonville.
From Andersonville to Savanna, (Georgia), then to Charleston and to Florence,
(South Carolina), and then to Wilmington, then to Goldsborough (North Carolina).
The Federals making it warm for the Confederates in North Carolina at that time,
he was soon taken back to Wilmington and paroled, and the weary pilgrimages of his
captivity were ended as he passed again within the Union lines. When he entered
Andersonville his weight was 150 pounds, and under the kind care of Captain Whirz
his weight was reduced to 75 pounds before he was released. He rapidly regained
his health but was exceedingly weak for some time after his release. Ronceverte,
Greenbrier county, West Virginia, is his post office address.

Samuel Jarrett

SAMUEL JARRETT – born in Blue Sulphur district, Greenbrier County, December
13, 1804, was a son of James and Ruth (GWINN) JARRETT, and grandson of
James and Elizabeth (GRIFFY) JARRETT, of Pennsylvania. The JARRETT family
were among the very first to come to Greenbrier county, and were two or
three times driven off by the Indians while effecting a settlement here,
which they finally succeeded in. They were always prominent in the affairs
of the county and of Blue Sulphur district, where the fourth generation
of the name is now living. The GWINNs were also very early settlers
here, and Samuel GWINN was the father of Ruth, mother of Samuel JARRETT. The
brothers and sisters of Samuel JARRETT were Elizabeth, Deliah, Ira, Joseph,
Andrew, Jacob, James, Ruth, Rosanna, Eveline, Margaret, and Sidney C.
Elizabeth lives in Missouri; Delilah died in Indiana; Ira died in Greenbrier
in 1851; Joseph lives in this county; Andrew died in Missouri; Jacob died in
infancy in this county; James lives in Greenbrier County; Ruth died in
Lewisburg in 1853; Rosanna lives in Monroe County, West Virginia; Eveline
died in this county in 1850; Margaret lives in Greenbrier County. Samuel
JARRETT and his brother Joseph were made political prisoners in 1862, by
the Federals, although not taking part in the war, probably through the
enmity of neighbors who reported falsely of them. They were sent to Camp
Chase, Ohio, and held six months, when they returned home and were not
again molested. Samuel JARRETT, now nearly eighty years of age, has never
married, and is one of the wealthiest landowners in the district, having
871 acres in one farm. His post office address is Palestine, Greenbrier County,
West Virginia.

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.

Submitted by Valerie Crook, , 1999.