Samuel G. Pomeroy

HANCOCK COUNTY WEST VIRGINIA – BIOS: POMEROY, Samuel G. (published 1923)
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Submitted by
Valerie Crook
vfcrook@trellis.net
September 12, 1999
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The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III,
pg. 221-222
Hancock County

SAMUEL G. POMEROY. Some individuals are fortunate
enough to inherit the spirit of industry, financial sense
and business capability which help to make them suc-
cessful in their life work, while others are obliged to strive
against adverse circumstances and only attain prosperity
and position because they have developed winning charac-
teristics themselves. Pughtown numbers among its most
responsible and representative men some who have been
satisfied to work out their destiny along the even lines
of ordinary occupations. They have not sought the ap-
plause of admiring throngs, nor have they desired to wrest
wealth from speculative enterprises, but, doing the duty
that lay nearest at hand, have gained material advance-
ment and the respect of their fellows. In this category
may be included Samuel G. Pomeroy, who is engaged in
the general merchandise business at Pughtown, a commu-
nity in which he is well known and highly regarded.

Mr. Pomeroy was born at Pughtown, October 14, 1867,
a son of Rev. Joseph S. and Isabel (Griffith) Pomeroy.
Rev. Joseph S. Pomeroy was married in Mercer County,
Pennsylvania, in 1849, and came to Hancock County, West
Virginia, as pastor of the old Flats Presbyterian Church
near Pughtown, the only church of that denomination in
Hancock County, whose members were scattered for a
radius of twenty miles in every direction. He lived at
Pughtown, where he bought a home, which is now occu-
pied by his son. Reverend Pomeroy served the old Flats
Church until 1877, a period of twenty-eight years, during
which time he labored faithfully, zealously, cheerfully and
unselfishly in behalf of his flock and his church, and built
up a large and prosperous congregation. He then spent
nine years as pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Mounds-
ville, following which he returned to his old home at Pugh-
town and went into semi-retirement, although he continued
to visit various churches as the demand arose until within
two or three years prior to his death, when advanced years
caused his complete retirement to a life of rest after a
long and eminently useful career. He died in August,
1907, at the age of eighty-five years, being buried at the
Flats Cemetery, while his worthy wife survived him twelve
years, passing away when but one month and six days less
than ninety-five years old. After he had retired from regu-
lar active work as a minister Reverend Pomeroy was
called upon frequently to officiate at special events. He
was called upon to act at funerals, and was popular at
marriages. During his long career he married parents
and later their children, and buried several generations of
the same family. He was also a popular lecturer, being a
man of broad information on a number of interesting and
important topics, and his voice was frequently heard from
the platform. He and Mrs. Pomeroy were the parents
of the following children: John B., who became a minis-
ter of the Presbyterian faith, preached in North Dakota,
Illinois and Ohio, retired to his home at Findlay, Ohio,
and died there in 1920; Chester, who for a time operated
the store started by his father soon after the Civil war at
Fairview, now Pughtown, and later became a merchant at
East Liverpool, Ohio, where he died;; Samuel G., of this
record; Jennie, who died in Colorado as the wife of Boss
Carney; Clara, who married D. L. Evans and died at Pugh-
town; Myra, unmarried, formerly deputy postmistress at
Pughtown and with her brother, Samuel G., in the store,
and who has remained as his constant companion and
housekeeper; and Ella, who married Frank McClellan and
went to Colorado.

Samuel G. Pomeroy received a public school education
at Pughtown and as a youth entered the store of his
brother Chester, whose interest in the business he later
bought. He has continued in the same line to the present,
and this enterprise now has the distinction of being the
oldest continuous business in Northern West Virginia.
Mr. Pomeroy carries a full line of general merchandise
and has developed an excellent business, his customers
being drawn from all over the surrounding countryside.
His old establishment, the original one, was destroyed by
fire in 1906, but was replaced immediately with a more
modern structure, the present one. In business circles Mr.
Pomeroy is known as the man of the strictest integrity
and probity. He has never evinced other than a good citi-
zen’s interest in polities, although his father kept posted
on election returns and was able to recall the returns of
every county in the state, a mathematical talent that was
also possessed by his son Chester. Samuel G. Pomeroy is
unmarried and resides with his sister Myra, a capable
housekeeper and a woman of many virtues and numerous
friendships. They are faithful members of the old Flats
Presbyterian Church, to the movements of which they con-
tribute liberally. While he does not take an active part
in public life, Mr. Pomeroy is a friend of progressive
and constructive enterprises tending to advance his com-
munity, and such receive his unqualified support.