Biographies of Noble County, Ohio – 1887

Biographies of Noble County, Ohio – 1887

 

John Wiley settled on the present Shafer farm, west of Caldwell, in 1810. He was born on the Susquehanna River, near Harrisburg, Pa.; came to Ohio in 1795, and located at Cedar Narrows, above Marietta, where he remained until he came to Duck Creek. His father, William Wiley, was a pioneer settler whre Sharon Village now is, and died in 1816. John Wiley married in Washington County, Charity Severs, a native of Massachusetts. They both died on the homestead farm, near Caldwell, Mr. Wiley at the age of ninety-two and his wife at the age of seventy-three. Their children were William, John, Abraham, David, Thomas, Jacob, James, Hamilton, Polly, Ann (Marshall), Betsey (Gray), Margaret (Moreland), and Charity A. (Woodford). Mrs. Woodford is the only one now living. All lived to have families except John and Polly. David, Thomas, James and Ann died in this county. The others lived here many years and then went west and south.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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Thomas Wiley was born in Washington County in 1809, and came with his parents to this county. After attaining his majority he entered 160 acres of land where Archibald Wiley now lives. There he remained until 1861, when he removed to the old homestead of his father, where he died in 1869. He married Maria Scott, a native of Pennsylvania, who was born near Hagerstown, Md. She died in 1878. They had eight children – Emeline, Delilah, Archibald, Eliza J. (deceased), Margaret (deceased), James, Dunlap and Mary E. Those living are all residents of Noble County. Archibald Wiley served in Company I, Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, from June 26, 1861, to August 26, 1864. James enlisted in the Fourth Battalion, six months’ cavalry, August 1, 1863, and was mustered out with the company. Dunlap was in the hundred day’s service.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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James W. Wiley, born in 1841, has spent most of his life in this county. He is now a guard in the Ohio penitentiary at Columbus, and has held the position since June 1, 1886. He married Rachel A. Matheny in 1868. They have five children living, one deceased.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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Archibald Wiley lives on the land entered by his father, and is a prominent farmer. He was born in Olive Township,
September 14, 1835. He was reared a farmer and has followed that occupation chiefly. He received a fair common-school
education and, by natural aptitude and shrewdness has been successful in life, and has an enviable reputation in the
community. He takes a deep interest in politics and is a firm Republican. He went as a private in the first company raised
in Noble County – Company I, Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry – serving from June 26, 1861, to August 26, 1864. Among
other engagements he was in the battles at Allegheny Mountain, Slaughter Mountain, Va., Second Bull Run, and Gettysburg. In
the last named battle he received two slight wounds; his regiment was in the thickest of the fight, and at its close only
seventy-five men were left uninjured and uncaptured, a second lieutenant commanding. Mr. Wiley was captured, but being left
asleep among the wounded, escaped. After the battle he was employed in hospital service until the following Christmas, when
he rejoined the regiment at Folly Island, S.C. There, on the reorganization of the regiment, he was transferred to the
Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until mustered out. After his return, February 16, 1865, he was
married to Mary E. Brown, whose parents were early settlers of Noble County. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley have no children.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887 

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Frederick Yerian is a grandson of Frederick Yerian, an early settler, and was born in Jackson Township, Noble County, in 1837. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and in early times used to make guns from the “raw material,” drilling the barrels and making the lock and stock himself. Frederick learned this trade. In 1847 he came to Sharon, and for the last fourteen years has carried on the drug business here. He enlisted September 21, 1864, in the Twenty-second Ohio Light Artillery and served until July 13, 1865. In 1869 he married Nancy E., daughter of Samuel Wiley, of Sharon Township; children – Lizzie E.J., William E., Mary W., Kate, Samuel F., Charles E., Cora L. and Susannah J. Kate married Samuel Wallace and died in 1884. The others are living. Mr. Yerian is a Democrat.

Frederick Yerian, Sr., was an early German settler. He was for some years engaged in operating a grist-mill and saw-mill. He injured his foot by stepping on a nail, the leg was amputated and he died from the effects of the operation. His son John was a gunsmith and learned his trade in Zanesville.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887 

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Thomas W. Parrish was born in McConnellsville, Ohio, in 1843. His father, William Parrish, son of Edward Parrish, who settled in Sharon Township in 1819, was then serving as sheriff of Morgan County, which office he held from 1841 to 1845. T.W. Parrish has followed farming and the mercantile business. He enlisted February 12, 1862, in Company D, Sixty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and by re-enlistment served until the close of the war, and was discharged at Louisville, Ky., July 8, 1865. He was in the engagements at New Madred, Island No. 10, Iuka, Corinth, siege of Vicksburg, Resaea, Lookout Mountain, Atlanta, and other battles of Sherman’s march to the sea. He is a Republican, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and of the Grand Army of the Republic and Odd Fellows. He was married in 1877 to Susannah B. Wiley, of Sharon; children: Helen M. and Henry S.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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Samuel Long was a prominent early settler, a man of intelligence and an exemplary citizen. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1786, and was of Scotch descent. He came to Ohio with his parents, who settled in Belmont County about 1800. In 1810 he married Mary Wiley and soon afterward settled near the site of the town of Caldwell, where he remained a short time, then removed to the farm in Sharon Township on which he died in 1868. His first wife died in 1824. She bore six children (three sons and three daughers). In 1825 Mr. Long married Mary Olephant, of Morgan County; she also had six children (five sons and one daugher). She died in 1852, and in 1853 Mr. Long married Hannah Read, of Muskingum County, who survived him a short time.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

Sharon

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Allen Woodford and wife (nee Woodruff) with a family of five children came from Connecticut to Marietta in 1817. Five children were afterwards born to them, and all are still living, viz: Andrew, Lydia A. (Wheeler), Aranda M., Helen (Colbig), Harry, Mary (Wiley), William, Hiram, and Elvira and Elmira (twins). The family came to Olive Township in 1818, where the parents died some years later. Aranda M. Woodford, a prominent farmer, lived at home until his marriage with Mercy Wheeler, by whom he had eleven children. His wife died in 1881, and he afterwards married Elizabeth McWilliams. One child has been born of this union. Mr. Woodford is a member of the Baptist church.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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George Willey was born in Pennsylvania, in 1804, and came with his parents to Noble County about 1817. He was a carpenter by trade, and several years after his immigration bought a mill near Belle Valley, which he operated until 1848, when he removed to Hoskinsville, and engaged in trade. He died in 1856. In 1828 he married Miss Nancy Westcott. They had seven children. Sylvester, one of the sons, was born in 1835. In 1864 he enlisted in the Twenty-Second Ohio Light Artillery and served until the close of the war. He and his wife, nee Ellen Moore, are members of the Protestant Episcopal church.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

Noble

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George Ayers, a native of one of the southern states, was born about 1811. He came to Guernsey County with his parents, and there married Nancy Brannon, who bore seven children, six of whom are living. He died in 1883, and his wife in 1870. David Ayers, son of George, was born in Noble Township in 1844. In 1869 he married Miss Alwild Willey. Their children are Luella and Willie. Mr. Ayers served in the late war in the One Hundred and Sixty-first and One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He is a successful farmer, and a member of the Methodist Protestant church. He has served as justice of the peace.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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William Cain and family came from Pennsylvania to Ohio at an early date. They reared nine children, two of whom are living in Noble County – one in Sharon Township and one in Olive. Nathaniel Cain was born in Morgan County in 1826. At the age of seventeen he began learning the cabinet-maker’s trade with James Hellyer, and followed that business for twenty-five years. He has since been engaged in farming. In 1846 he enlisted in the Mexican war, but was discharged two weeks after his enlistment. In 1847 he married Rebecca Willey. Of their seven children six are living – William H., Valentine H., Sarah J., Catharine (Ward), Mary A. and Elizabeth C. (Heddleston). Mr. Cain has served as township trustee and in other local offices.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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No name is more conspicuous in the annals of Noble County than that of McKee. The family were not only among the first in the county in point of settlement, but were also pioneers in almost every important public enterprise ever undertaken in the county.

The McKees were of Irish descent, and came to Ohio in the latter part of the last century, from Lycoming County, Pa. The family consisted of David McKee, his wife and several children. They remained a number of years in Washington County, in the vicinity of Marietta, and in 1809 came up the West Fork of Duck Creek, settling on the farm near Caldwell, now owned by Alexander McKee. They were among the very earliest families in the valley, and for several years had but few neighbors and no trading point nearer than Marietta. The father died in 1815, and the widow and her children were left to get along as best they could in the arduous labor of pioneer farming. Mrs. McKee died in 1848. There were nine children in the family, most of whom were born in Pennsylvania. Their names were John, Robert, William, David, James, Alexander, Annie (Caldwell), Margaret (Caldwell) and Ezra.

John was a farmer, a prominent citizen, and passed his life in Noble County. He died in 1873, at the age of eighty-five. Robert was the pioneer salt-maker at Olive, and was a leading business man in this section for many years. He was born in Lycoming County, Pa., December 8, 1791, and came with the family to Duck Creek in 1809. He stamped his name on all the prominent events in the early history of what is now Noble County. He was the discoverer and pioneer salt-maker of the valley, a busines which he continued until the competition of the various salt works on the Muskingam reduced the price to fifty cents per barrel. While drilling some of the first wells, he was obliged to to to Marietta to get his tools repaired. After the salt business became unremunerative he built a log structure in Olive, where for many years he did a successful business as a merchant; his was the first store within the present limits of Noble County, his nearest competitor being at Barnesville. His first stock of goods was packed in on horse from Baltimore over the mountains. He was also the first to handle tobacco, in which he engaged quite extensively for many years. He was a man of deep religious convictions, and built the first church in the county; in this enterprise he evidenced his accustomed liberality. After deciding to build a church, he deputized a man by the name of Peter Lady to solicit subscriptions. After several weeks, Lady reprted $45 as the sum collected. McKee, disappointed by the lack of interest in the matter, said to him that if he would return the money he would build the church himself, which he did. The date of erection, as near as can now be ascertained, was 1828. About 1855 he began to the feel the weight of advancing years and retured from active business, and devoted his attention to his farm, and loaning the accumulations of former years. He died of Bright’s disease September, 1863. He was married in 1813 to Miss Ruth Thorla. She died in 1830, and in November of the same year he was again married to Elizabeth Willey., who died in 1887. By the first marriage there were six children: Mary A., Margaret (Morse), Susannah (Ogle), David, Rhoda (Rownd) and Martha (Ogle). By the second, seven: Columbus, Leonard, William, Robert, Ruth E. (Caldwell), Jasper and Worthington. Robert McKee was a man of great foresight, enterprise and industry, and his name, where known, was a synonym for integrity and honor. No man was more prominent in the early history of Noble than he, and no one is held in more grateful remembrance by the people.

William removed to New York State when a young man, and spent the greater part of his life there. He died in Indiana. David was engaged as a boatman on the Mississippi River and died of cholera at Little Rock, Ark., when a young man. James was a farmer and resided near Hoskinsville. He died at the age of eighty-seven. Alexander is still living on the old homestead. He was born in Marietta in 1798. He married Rhoda Thorla and reared a family of six sons. Annie became the wife of Joseph Caldwell and is still living.

Hon. Ezra McKee was one of the best and most influential citizens of Noble County, the establishment of which he was among the foremost in securing. He was born in Washington County in 1802, and came to the county with his parents. His educational advantages were limited to four month’s schooling, but a good mind, sound judgement and keenness of observation made up for this deficiency. In 1825 he married Abbie Westcott and purchased the farm adjoining the old homestead. His children by this union were Delia (Davis), Martha (Polling), David and Sylvester, all living. His wife died in 1836 and he married Almay Westcott, a cousin of his first wife. She was one of the early school-teachers of the county. To them were born four children – Manly, who died when one year old; Mary (Newton), deceased; Christopher and Manly. In 1837 Mr. McKee was elected to the legislature from Morgan County, in which his township was then included; and again in 1850 he was chosen to fill the same position. During the succeeding session of the legislature, the project of the erection of Noble County, which had been constantly agitated for five or six years preceding, was brought to a successful consummation. He was not only instrumental in securing the organization of the county, but he was also among the foremost of those who sought and finally succeeded in making Caldwell the county seat. He erected the first building in Caldwell, which was used as a temporary court house. He served about twenty years as justice of the peace. Both in public and private life he was regarded as an able, honest, honorable man. He died April 4, 1876. His widow resides with her son, Christopher.

David E. McKee is the oldest son of Hon. Ezra McKee. He was born in Noble Township, August 15, 1833. He is a quiet, unassuming man, and sustains an excellent reputation for probity and intelligence. Mr. McKee has contributed to the press some poetical effusions of more than ordinary merit. He was principally engaged in farming until 1862, when he went with his brother Christopher to the Pacific coast, where they remained for three years, engaged in mining and ranching, in which they were quite successful. In 1867 he married Margaret Powell, of Wisconsin, whose paternal great-grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. Her great-grandmother on her father’s side lived to be one hundred and four years old. Mr. and Mrs. McKee have three children: Burton, Abbie and Lawrence. Mr. McKee is a Democrat. He had held the offices of township treasurer and land appraiser.

Christopher McKee, one of the leading farmers and most prominent citizens of the county, was born in Noble Township in 1840. He spent his boyhood on the farm, receiving a common-school education. In 1862 he wetn to Oregon in a party of twelve men, among whom was his brother David. This journey occupied about three months, Mr. McKee driving an ox-team. On the Pacific coast he engaged in mining for a time, and afterward went to Idaho. He remained at Centerville in that territory until June, 1863, engaged in packing supplies to the miners. He next went to the southern part of the territory, where David and he located a mine, which they worked until the fall of 1865. The mine proved a good one and yielded many thousand dollars’ worth of ore, but owing to the cost of living and of working it, they could save but a small part of their earnings. During one winter the snow was so deep that it was piled up six feet higher than their cabin. The brothers left for home in September, 1865, on horseback and reached here in November. On the way they were caught in a Rocky Mountain snow storm, and rode all day through the blinding snow, arriving at night at Fort Halleck. To feed their horses they paid seventy-five cents per pound for corn and twenty-five cents per pound for hay. At the sutler’s Mr. McKee bought a pound of crackers, a box of sardines, and a small bottle of bitters, for which he paid $15. In December, 1865, he married Miss Martha A. Scott. They have had four children – Louis W. (deceased), Irvel K., Cora B. and Mirley. Mr. McKee has followed farming, and has also been engaged in various other enterprises. He has furnished the C.&M. Railroad Company with over five million feet of lumber, and is still engaged in supplying timber to that road, and the B.Z.&C. In 1877 he again went west to the Black Hills; but after an examination of that region, concluded to settle down to farm life. Mr. McKee is a public-spirited citizen, an enterprising sagacious and successful man of business, and his worth is appreciated in the community.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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David Radcliff is an old settler, and a very worthy citizen. He was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1813. At the age of seventeen he came to America with two brothers, landing in Quebec. In 1830 he came to Olive Township, where he entered eighty acres, which is now part of the farm of Samuel Ackley. The place was then unimproved. Mr. Radcliff worked alone until 1837. He then married Jane Miller, of Noble Township. They had seven children, four of whom are living – William, who married Eliza Shriver (who is now deceased), Martha (Davis), Ann (Willey) and David H. Mr. Radcliff is a Universalist and a Mason.

History of Noble County, Ohio Published by L.H. Watkins & Co. of Chicago 1887

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